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Europe Editor, Katya Adler, presents a debate focusing on the European Union post Brexit. Politicians from across the region and the political spectrum discuss tough questions put to them by the public on issues such as the EU's environmental record, migration, Brexit, bailouts, the handling of the pandemic and the future of the Union.…
 
Rivalry between Trump’s United States and Xi’s China is rampant: from disagreements on trade tariffs, on Hong Kong and the Uighurs and, of course, the source of Covid-19. But underlying it all is the growing tech war between these two economic superpowers, with giants like Huawei on the battlefield. For its part, China denies access to Google, Face…
 
The terrible choice between hunger and infection, police imposing lockdowns with brutality and the unexpected positives to come out of the pandemic in Africa. Presenter Toyosi Ogunseye in Lagos examines these issues with panellists Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa; Bright Simons, social entrepreneur based in Congo and president…
 
How has Latin America dealt with the pandemic? The lockdown, the needs of the economy, cash pay-outs to the poor, culture, tradition and safety in a time of crisis are all discussed with an expert panel and questions from the public across the region. Presenter Jonny Dymond is joined by Dr Denise Dresser, political scientist, Mexico; Luiz Philippe …
 
World Questions responds to the global Coronavirus crisis with a special programme focussing on the pandemic in Europe. Jonny Dymond will explore the challenges posed by and the consequences of the outbreak of COVID-19 as he is joined by a panel of experts from across the continent who answer questions from the public. The panel: Dunja Mijatovic: C…
 
Coronavirus , multibillion dollar debt, inflation, poverty - the new government faces a host of challenges. Will President Fernandez’s team be able to turn the tide, and see the highly-educated, resource-rich, vast and fertile Republic of Argentina return to prosperity? What about Falklands/Las Malvinas? And plans to legalise abortion in the Pope’s…
 
The recent upsurge in violence against foreigners, mostly from elsewhere in Africa, is raising fears that xenophobic attacks in South Africa are on the rise. Political leaders from across party divides have been accused of tapping into existing anti-African sentiment and have helped create a hostile environment and stoked anti-immigrant sentiment f…
 
Nigeria is one of the world’s largest oil producers, but national infrastructure, youth unemployment and insecurity are huge challenges for its civilian government. Jihadist attacks and separatist movements threaten to tear the country apart and despite being the biggest economy south of the Sahara, extreme poverty is very high. What next for Niger…
 
This month, World Questions comes to Lisbon to bring together leading politicians and the public to discuss the issues that matter to Portuguese people: education and public health services, the environment, housing, tourism and how best to grow the economy. The programme, which will be presented by the BBC’s Manuela Saragosa, will be recorded in f…
 
Gun rights, racism, climate change, impeachment are some of the big issues convulsing the United States. In downtown Houston, Congressman Joaquin Castro, Judge Lina Hidalgo, Congressman Randy Weber and State Senator Joan Huffman join Jonny Dymond to debate questions raised by the audience in Houston. BBC World Questions is a series of international…
 
In the last few days Turkey has launched an air and ground offensive in Northern Syria and this unilateral decision has been widely condemned that’s been widely condemned with the European Union urging Turkey to end its offensive. What implications does this have for Turkey’s future role as a power in the region? Zeinab Badawi travels to Istanbul t…
 
In a world already facing the challenges of exploding population growth and climate change, will super-rich global elites foster resentment, dangerous discontent and political populism? Zeinab Badawi discusses the issues with a high-profile panel at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Goalkeepers event in New York…
 
Worries about jobs, inequality, waste, corruption and issues such as the country's elephant population and the decriminalisation of homosexuality give the sense that Botswana is at a turning point, and the opposition and the government are both promising change. World Questions comes to Botswana for a vibrant debate in the heat of an election campa…
 
Anu Anand and a panel of leading correspondents from around the world discuss the big political trends of the year. The rise of populist political parties, Brexit, powerful leaders and immigration are just some of the big issues up for discussion. Panellists include Ethiopian journalist and editor of The Addis Standard, Tsedale Lemma; Susan Glasser…
 
Multiculturalism was once the dream of many countries around the world, encouraging ethnically diverse cultures to live side by side in harmony. But critics say that dream has failed: that too many communities live separately – pursuing segregation rather than integration, fuelling dangerous resentment. Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith soci…
 
World Questions comes to Ethiopia at a crucial time in the country’s history. Ethiopia’s prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, has initiated a series of unprecedented reforms in his first year in office. He's made peace with Eritrea, freed 60,000 political prisoners, unbanned opposition groups and appointed women to half his cabinet. The BBC’s Jonathan Dimbl…
 
The deep divisions of Brexit Britain are explored with a raucous London audience and an expert panel. A further referendum? The Prime Minister's withdrawal deal? How has voting to leave the European Union affected Britain’s standing in the world? BBC World Questions is in the capital to debate some of the contentious issues that are still dividing …
 
Following a popular and peaceful uprising last year, the country’s new Prime Minister, Nikol Pashinyan, won over 70% of the vote at recent elections. He says his political bloc will now lead an economic revolution that will help pull many of its people out of poverty. How will the new government deliver this transformation? Will it balance growth a…
 
Some believe Europe is more divided than ever. After years of austerity and migration, populists are on the rise in countries like Italy, framing politics as a battle between ordinary voters and a corrupt European ‘establishment’. But the continent is also divided over how to move forward in a world where rising economic powerhouses threaten to dom…
 
Indian classical music is an art form that’s been in the making for thousands of years and has exponentially grown in popularity, seeing a 70% increase in people taking exams in the UK alone. First mentioned in its simplest form in the Hindu scriptures known as the vedas, some 3,500 years ago, we tell the story of how the music has educated and lib…
 
In 1927 Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein created Ol’ Man River to bind their breakthrough Broadway musical Show Boat. Giving it an almighty showstopper. Audiences were carried away as ‘Joe’, the ordinary black labourer, took centre stage to sing of toil and suffering in the land of cotton along the banks of the Mississippi. From the beginning it t…
 
Following a swing to the right in elections last year, Austria is governed by a coalition between the ruling Conservative People’s Party and the far-right Freedom Party. It has taken over the presidency of the Council of the European Union with the motto, “A Europe that protects”, with a focus on efforts to prevent illegal immigration into the EU. …
 
After 70 years of independence Global Questions travels to New Delhi to assess India today, where it stands on the international stage, and its fast growing economic strength, which some say could help it rival China as a global powerhouse. Join Zeinab Badawi at Bikaner House in the heart of New Delhi as she brings together an audience drawn from a…
 
Can engineering solve the world’s problems? Three of the world’s greatest bio engineers discuss climate change, crop failure and infertility at a special event staged in partnership with the Royal Commission for the Great Exhibition of 1851. Professor Madeleine Van Oppen of the Australian Institute of Marine Science is developing heat resistant cor…
 
BBC World Questions is in Copenhagen to host a debate on Denmark's future. It has a reputation for being one of the happiest places on the planet but for many that has always felt like a bit of a myth. Increasingly the challenges of immigration, integration, and high taxes are causing some Danes to question whether their country can still afford a …
 
From Zimbabwe to Hong Kong, Washington to Seoul, World Questions showcases the views of a vast array of panellists and audiences from around the world. No two programmes are the same – yet the questions asked are often similar. Immigration, the environment, the rise of populism, wealth distribution and corruption - the themes are of universal conce…
 
Aretha Franklin, for fifty years the Queen of Soul, with a voice of unique quality and who suffered a difficult and troubled life, has died at the age of 76. Jumoke Fashola hears from musicians, fans and producers from different parts of the world about what made Aretha Franklin’s music special. It Includes contributions from South African singer L…
 
Lagos - Nigeria’s biggest city and its commercial centre. It’s a noisy, vibrant, hectic place, one of the world’s fastest-growing cities and the most populated in Africa. Like most of Africa, the majority of Nigeria’s population is aged under 30. That’s more than 100 million people. And yet, the young are barely visible in the corridors of politica…
 
In a highly charged debate, an audience of Zimbabweans debates the upcoming presidential elections, land reform, the economic crisis and the legacy of the former President, Robert Mugabe. The panel includes Paul Mangwana of Zanu PF, Welshman Ncube of the MDC Alliance, Fadzayi Mahere – independent parliamentary candidate, and Trevor Ncube – the jour…
 
Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public. There was heated debate about billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis who has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the health service, membership of th…
 
What can be done to counter the spread of false and misleading information on social media? Sir David Spiegelhalter, Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk at Cambridge University, has been travelling to classrooms around the world for a World Service documentary examining new strategies to combat the phenomenon. Ahead of the Commonwealth He…
 
Ghana was the first country in Sub-Saharan Africa to break free of colonial rule, and remains one of the most stable democracies in West Africa. It relies on gold, cocoa and more recently oil as cornerstones of its economy and has rich resources of fish, timber, bauxite and industrial diamonds. Despite those riches, poverty is widespread and corrup…
 
Peruvian-born chef and record producer Martin Morales heads back to his homeland to explore the inherent link between food and music in Andean culture. Martin starts his journey at the famous La Chomba restaurant in Cusco, where musicians queue to serenade the diners, and then heads to the tiny village of Lamay where the local delicacy is guinea pi…
 
Due to the political climate in Soviet Russia of the day, Yevgeny Murzin was forced to build his synthesizer in secret with little access to electronic parts. Over next two decades (pre and post war), the ANS as it was known, was a self-financed, largely secret labour of love; Murzin had to work on it in his spare time over two decades with help fr…
 
Unlike its regional neighbours, Lebanon appeared to be entering a period of political and economic stability. But tension is mounting as Saudi Arabia escalates its power struggle with Iran. As Iran continues to exert its influence and defend its interest across the region, there is growing concern about how the conflict might affect the stability o…
 
BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre. Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević…
 
After a historic election, Nepal has chosen a communist coalition to run the country. Could this landslide victory for the Left Alliance mark a turning point for the country, and deliver a long awaited period of political stability and peace? Will the coalition remain united? How will it deal with Nepal’s two giant neighbours – China and India? And…
 
Known as the Queen of Soul, voice artists have been in awe of Aretha Franklin for 50 years. In Aretha at 75 Mark Coles talks to musicians, fans and producers from different parts of the world about what makes her so special.Including contributions from South African singer Lira, American musician Valerie June, record company mogul Clive Davis, prod…
 
With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the Nafta trade agreement? And what positions will the presidenti…
 
Ancient history was not silent, so why is our study of it? The oldest-known musical instruments – bone flutes found in southern Germany – date back a little over 40,000 years. But how long humans have been making music in one form or another is a matter of great speculation. What did ‘music’ mean in the context of our Palaeolithic and Neolithic for…
 
Kenya has the largest economy in Central and Eastern Africa. It is a proud democracy with a liberal economy, but the country is going through troubled times. After months of divisive legal and political processes it is experiencing its worst crisis for a decade. From the University of Nairobi with a large audience, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of …
 
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