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Arts Calling is a podcast to celebrate creatives across disciplines and cultural backgrounds, but also a case for the arts as the gateway to empathy, healthy lives, and strong communities. Writer/Director Jaime Alejandro catches up with friends and artists in the written, visual, and performing arts to hear their origin story, how to overcome real-world hardships, and why it is essential to remain true to an artistic calling. We hope you join us in this celebration of the creative pursuit!
 
Join host David Fleming for a program dedicated to Arts and Entertainment in our region, as well as the people and places providing it. Interviews with authors, producers, visual artists and musicians, spotlighting a classic album or a brand new release. From musical legends and icons - to players at the local level, from Broadway tours to Community theater, from the Hollywood Bowl to the Redlands Bowl.
 
Artspan's Chief Editor Nina Alvarez serves up tips and talk for artists who want to market and sell their own work online using some cheap, easy, and interesting Web 2.0 strategies. Artspan is an online arts portal and art community. http://artspan.com
 
The Luminous Podcast is a discussion series featuring artists, designers, and engineers active in the new media art scenes. Join the host Robb Pope, cofounder of Digital Ambiance and longtime visual artist, on a journey exploring the landscape of modern new-media arts. The guests range from VJ’s to Sculptural Artists, Lighting techs, VR Designers and everyone in between. The discussions featured on the podcast are an honest, in-depth look at the lives and challenges facing today's most accom ...
 
Mental Health Arts is a year-round arts programme led by the Mental Health Foundation Scotland, built around the annual Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival (SMHAF). Established in 2007, the festival is one of the largest of its kind in the world and among Scotland's most diverse cultural events, covering everything from music, film and visual art to theatre, dance, and literature.
 
Impact and Arts, hosted by Adele Sinagra, is an interview podcast that dives deep into the impact that a variety of art forms and industries can have on people. We believe that the arts have the potential for positive social and personal change, and seek to illuminate this by having conversations with a wide range of creators and performers- musicians, dancers, writers, actors, visual artists, you name it. Each episode, you will learn about our guest’s journey and experiences with the arts, ...
 
A 1-hour, conversational podcast for artists that aims to provide different viewpoints to different issues relevant to the contemporary creative’s career development by simply asking: should I or shouldn’t I? Artists of the Houston community from all walks of life and practices provide their insight, experiences, and expertise through a series of questions, both organic and pre-set, that will ultimately answer this main question. The guest artists are curated to provide alternate viewpoints ...
 
Haarlem Artspace is located in the historic grade II* listed Arkwright built Haarlem Mill in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, England. We champion contemporary, rurally based artists and creative professionals. Our ambitious program of exhibitions and events attracts new audiences to historic Wirksworth and the inspiring landscape we are based in. These podcasts are a means to allow a wider audience to access our in conversation and artist talk events. They also showcase contemporary instrumental and ...
 
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We’re excited as the start of the 2021-22 school year approaches on August 16. We will be back in school, in-person with full-day instruction five days a week. This includes after school programs and extracurricular activities! Los Angeles Unified is prepared to welcome everyone back with the highest standard of safety protocols at every campus. We…
 
For more than thirteen centuries, caravans transported millions of enslaved people from Africa south of the Sahara into what is now the Kingdom of Morocco. Today there are no museums, plaques, or monuments that recognize this history of enslavement, but enslaved people and their descendants created the Gnawa identity that preserves this largely sup…
 
How can music change the world? In Sonic Intimacy: Reggae Sound Systems, Jungle Pirate Radio and Grime YouTube Music Videos (Bloomsbury, 2020), Malcolm James, Senior Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Sussex, introduces the concept of sonic intimacy to think through the social, cultural, and political importance of three ke…
 
Art as an Interface of Law and Justice: Affirmation, Disturbance, Disruption (Hart Publishing, 2021) looks at the way in which the 'call for justice' is portrayed through art and presents a wide range of texts from film to theatre to essays and novels to interrogate the law. Such calls may have their positive connotations, but throughout history mo…
 
In Dancing with the Revolution: Power, Politics, and Privilege in Cuba (UNC Press, 2021), Elizabeth B. Schwall aligns culture and politics by focusing on an art form that became a darling of the Cuban revolution: dance. In this history of staged performance in ballet, modern dance, and folkloric dance, Schwall analyzes how and why dance artists int…
 
Believing Your Ears: Examining Auditory Illusions is based on an extensive filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Diana Deutsch, Professor of Psychology at UC San Diego and one of the world’s leading experts on the psychology of music. This conversation provides behind the scenes insights into her discovery of a large number of auditory illu…
 
Susan Barrett, President of Barrett Barrera Projects, stopped by to talk with Nancy about the projects they are involved in. Susan Barrett A piece from Freedom is for Everybody Among the topics discussed is the exhibition Freedom is for Everybody, an exhibition of work by Swedish-American artist Michele Pred. In her artistic practice, Pred uses scu…
 
The Science of Siren Songs: Stradivari Unveiled is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and master violinmaker and acoustician Joseph Curtin, recipient of a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. This in-depth conversation explores Curtin’s long quest to characterize the sound of a Stradivari violin and the rigorous series of d…
 
Throughout her career, spanning more than two decades, Jessica Hopper, a revered and pioneering music critic, has examined women recording and producing music, in all genres, through an intersectional feminist lens. The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic (MCD x Fsg Originals, 2021) features oral histories of bands like Hol…
 
Welcome to the first episode of Arts Calling! We begin by starting at the very beginning. I asked Brenda Zamora (my actress sister) to help me even slightly unpack some of the things we experienced growing up that made us into the creatives we are today. About Brenda:Brenda Zamora is a Mexican actress; she was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and raised in…
 
At a time when what it means to watch movies keeps changing, this book offers a case study that rethinks the institutional, ideological, and cultural role of film exhibition, demonstrating that film exhibition can produce meaning in itself apart from the films being shown. Cinema Off Screen: Moviegoing in Socialist China (U California Press, 2021) …
 
Tiffany Trenda is a new media fashion artist based out of LA. We met each other through my friend Anouk, another new media artist active in the fashion-tech scene. I was curious how the conversation would go. We spoke on the phone about a week ago and our conversation was really flowing. That totally continued through this episode. She’s spent her …
 
On today's edition of KVC-Arts, David speaks with author, Raymond Straight. At the age of 97, he is still writing and publishing books. He has authored or co-authored biographies on Bob Hope, Rosemary Clooney, Lou Costello, James Garner, and Jayne Mansfield. You can find his books in most bookstores and online retailers.…
 
Last month, Christopher Newport University announced an initiative called the New Musicals Lab. The New Musicals Lab brings together writers, directors, composers, designers, and performers from all over the country to create and workshop musical theatre in the safe haven of Hampton Roads. Rebecca Weinstein spoke with Artistic Producer Colin Ruffer…
 
Wassan Al-Khudhairi, Chief Curator of the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, stopped by to talk with Nancy about the museum and one of the current exhibitions, Stories of Resistance. Stories of Resistance explores artistic forms of resistance from across the world. Through visual narratives, artists amplify and bring to focus the multitude of condi…
 
Pablo Palomino's The Invention of Latin American Music (Oxford UP, 2020) reconstructs the transnational history of the category of Latin American music during the first half of the twentieth century, from a longer perspective that begins in the nineteenth century and extends the narrative until the present. It analyzes intellectual, commercial, sta…
 
Music from East Asia has recently been making its way round the world on waves created and mediated by new technologies and global interconnections. This may seem like something very novel, but as Andrew Jones shows in Circuit Listening: Chinese Popular Music in the Global 1960s (U Minnesota Press, 2020), popular music from this region – and here s…
 
Quanice sits down with Ashraf Hasham, Funding Programs Manager and Youth Arts Manager for the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture, to discuss accountability, breaking down barriers in a government arts agency, and the great resignation…all while sipping wine. Links: Anti-Black Discrimination and Toxic Workplaces Are All Too Common in the Arts Admini…
 
Brooke McCorkle Okazaki’s Shonen Knife’s Happy Hour, part of the 33 1/3 music history and culture series, is a joyful romp through the career of the internationally successful Japanese trio, Shonen Knife. The book focuses on the intersection of food, gender, and music for these pioneers of what Okazaki calls “josei rock,” in other words, music by w…
 
We live in a networked world. Online social networking platforms and the World Wide Web have changed how society thinks about connectivity. Because of the technological nature of such networks, their study has predominantly taken place within the domains of computer science and related scientific fields. But arts and humanities scholars are increas…
 
Paola Hernandez's book Staging Lives in Latin American Theater: Bodies, Objects, Archives (Northwestern UP, 2021) looks at a wide range of documentary theatre practices across South and Central America, including the plays of Guillermo Calderón, the biodramas of Vivi Tellas, and the autobiographical reenactments of Lola Arias. Throughout, she exami…
 
On today's edition of KVC-Arts, David Fleming speaks with Nathan Goethals, CEO of Affordable Music Productions. Nathan talks about his musical background and his upcoming performance at The Summer Sunset Concert series Saturday, July 24th at the Donna Franco Garden, Noble Creek Community Center in Beaumont. Nathan also shares about Affordable Music…
 
Southern women of all classes, races, and walks of life practiced music during and after the Civil War. Dr. Candace Bailey examines the history of southern women through the lens of these musical pursuits, uncovering the ways that music's transmission, education, circulation, and repertory help us understand its meaning in the women's culture of th…
 
Keith Watson, owner and operator of Arkadin Cinema and Bar, is an attorney by day, and a connoisseur of film by night. He stopped by to talk with Nancy about this new business. Named after a film by one of their favorite filmmakers, Orson Welles, the Arkadin is a microcinema in the heart of Bevo located at 5228 Gravois Ave. The cinema shows a mix o…
 
In Punks in Peoria: Making a Scene in the American Heartland (University of Illinois, 2021) Jonathan Wright and Dawson Barret explore do-it-yourself scene built by Peoria punks, performers, and scenesters in the 1980s and 1990s. Peoria, Illinois the quintessential Midwest town, where "if it could play in Peoria, it could play anywhere," was fertile…
 
Stefania Marghitu's Teen TV (Routledge, 2021)explores the history of television's relationship to teens as a desired, but elusive audience, and the ways in which television has embraced youth subcultures, tracing the shifts in American and global televisual and youth cultures. Organized chronologically, Teen TV starts with Baby Boomers and moves to…
 
Tom Ridgely, Producing Artistic Director of St. Louis Shakespeare Festival, stopped by to talk to Nancy about the American Ballet Theatre's ABT Across America Tour. The St. Louis performances of the tour will happen July 14th in Shakespeare Glen in Forest Park. The performances are presented in partnership with Susan Sherman, COCA and St. Louis Sha…
 
“What are we thinking about when we think about music in non-naturalistic terms?” asks Benjamin Steege—Assistant Professor of Music Theory, Columbia University—in his new book An Unnatural Attitude: Phenomenology in Weimar Musical Thought (University of Chicago Press, 2021). This deceptively subtle question exercised the minds of some of Europe's m…
 
Children’s folklore is simultaneously a conservator of tradition and a site for creativity and innovation. For over five decades, Dr. Jeanne Pitre Soileau documented and collected the jokes, chants, rhymes, and games that that she observed on school playgrounds throughout her career as a public school teacher in southern Louisiana. From the early d…
 
Would there have been a Third World without the Second? Perhaps, but it would have looked very different. Although most histories of these geopolitical blocs and their constituent societies and cultures are written in reference to the West, the interdependence of the Second and Third Worlds is evident not only from a common nomenclature but also fr…
 
Quanice sits down with Jen Deerinwater, Founding Executive Director of Crushing Colonialism, to discuss repatriation, capitalism, unity amongst the global majority, and burning this motherf*cker down…all while sipping wine. Links: Jen Deerinwater's Linktree - https://linktr.ee/CrushingColonialism Skeletons in the Closet: the Smithsonian’s Native Am…
 
Federico Fellini’s distinct style delighted generations of film viewers and inspired filmmakers and artists around the world. In Fellini’s Films and Commercials: From Postwar to Postmodern, renowned Fellini scholar Frank Burke presents a film-by-film analysis of the famed director’s cinematic output from a theoretical perspective. The book explores…
 
Monika Weiss, who is an internationally known multimedia artist, stopped by to talk with Nancy about her work and her life. Monika Weiss Artist portrait, 2019. still from video interview: Adam Hogan and Laura Stayton In a multidisciplinary practice that encompasses video, film, performance, sound, drawing and sculpture, the Polish-American artist M…
 
It is now just over a decade since protests in Cairo's Tahrir Square started Egypt's chapter in the events of the Arab Spring. Much has been made in western criticism of art and culture's role in the revolution, but the everyday cultural production of studio artists, graffiti artists, musicians, and writers since has attracted less attention. How h…
 
Cassie Brand, Curator of Rare Books for Washington University in St. Louis, stopped by to speak with Nancy about the Olin Library and the Rare Books Collections at the University. Cassie Brand: Curator of Rare Books Olin Library at Washington University Cassie Brand has been Curator of Rare Books at the Washington University Libraries since 2017. S…
 
Theatre has long been considered a feminine interest for which women consistently purchase the majority of tickets, while the shows they are seeing typically are written and brought to the stage by men. Furthermore, the stories these productions tell are often about men, and the complex leading roles in these shows are written for and performed by …
 
George Frederick Bristow, born in 1825, was a significant musical figure in the United States from the 1850s until his death in 1898. Now, almost one hundred years after his birth, Katherine Preston has just written his first biography--George Frederick Bristow (University of Illinois Press, 2020)-- as part of the American Composers Series. Bristow…
 
Nostalgia has received increasing attention for its role in shaping contemporary social and political life in the United States. Dr. Badia Ahad-Legardy distinguishes Afro-Nostalgia as a framework to think about the relationship between affect, black historical memory, and joy. Afro-Nostalgia: Feeling Good in Contemporary Black Culture (University o…
 
On today's edition of KVC-Arts, Maraget Worsley speaks with Dana Zimbric, Artistic Director and conductor with the California Chamber Orchestra. You’ll hear about the California Chamber Orchestra organization, as well as an upcoming performance by the Hausmann Quartet in the garden at the Murrieta Public Library, with works by Haydn and more.…
 
What makes a woman 'bad' is commonly linked to certain 'qualities' or behaviours seen as morally or socially corrosive, dirty and disgusting. Bad Girls, Dirty Bodies: Sex, Performance and Safe Femininity (Bloomsbury, 2020) explores the social, sexual and political significance of women who are labelled bad or dirty. Through case studies (including …
 
Richard Thompson's Beeswing: Losing My Way and Finding My Voice 1967-1975 (Algonquin Books, 2021) gives fans of his music a tale as rollicking and entertaining as the reels and ballads he recorded with the band Fairport Convention. Fairport Convention was one of the central bands in the British Folk Rock scene, blending traditional English songs an…
 
Dancing the Dharma: Religious and Political Allegory in Japanese Noh Theater (Harvard UP, 2020) examines the theory and practice of allegory by exploring a select group of medieval Japanese noh plays and treatises. Susan Blakeley Klein demonstrates how medieval esoteric commentaries on the tenth-century poem-tale Ise monogatari (Tales of Ise) and t…
 
Isabel Rosario Cooper, if mentioned at all by mainstream history books, is often a salacious footnote: the young Filipino mistress of General Douglas MacArthur, hidden away at the Charleston Hotel in DC. Empire’s Mistress, Starring Isabel Rosario Cooper (Duke University Press: 2021) by Professor Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez refuses to reduce Cooper’s…
 
Today I talked to Jessica Helfand about her new book Face: A Visual Odyssey (MIT Press, 2019) Helfand is a designer, artist, and author. She’s taught at Yale University for more than 20 years, cofounded Design Observer, and has had additional roles at a variety of institutions ranging from the American Academy in Rome to the California Institute of…
 
It is almost twenty years since contemporary art took a ‘participation turn’. Now, just about every museum or theatre company has a participation or engagement department. It is nothing short of orthodoxy that one of art’s core roles is to reach out to audiences beyond art institutions - and paradoxically it is often art institutions that mandate t…
 
Gospel music evolved in often surprising directions during the post-Civil Rights era. Claudrena N. Harold's in-depth look at late-century gospel, When Sunday Comes: Gospel Music in the Soul and Hip-Hop Eras (U Illinois Press, 2020), focuses on musicians like Yolanda Adams, Andraé Crouch, the Clark Sisters, Al Green, Take 6, and the Winans, and on t…
 
How does the record industry work? In Getting Signed: Record Contracts, Musicians, and Power in Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), David Arditi, Associate Professor in Sociology and Anthropology at University of Texas at Arlington, analyses the ideology of getting signed and getting a record contract to show the alienating and exploitative effects…
 
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