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The Guardian Long Read - audio versions of our regular long reads published online and in the newspaper Monday through Friday. The long reads are long form articles on a wide variety of topics from global politics to the big cultural debates of our time. For the print version go to - http://www.theguardian.com/news/series/the-long-read
 
The Audio Long Read podcast is a selection of the Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more
 
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show series
 
It’s hard to convey the full depth and range of the trauma, the chaos and the indignity that people are being subjected to. Meanwhile, Modi and his allies are telling us not to complain. By Arundhati Roy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
This year marks a very special moment in the history of the Guardian. It is 200 years since the first incarnation of the newpaper, a four-page weekly, first appeared in Manchester. In honour of this we have dug very deep into our archive to bring you a piece from 100 years ago. In May 1921, the great Manchester Guardian editor CP Scott wrote a lead…
 
Jeffrey Karp is at the forefront of a new generation of scientists using nature’s blueprints to create breakthrough medical technologies. Can bioinspiration help to solve some of humanity’s most urgent problems? By Laura Parker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
After growing up in a Zimbabwe convulsed by the legacy of colonialism, when I got to Oxford I realised how many British people still failed to see how empire had shaped lives like mine – as well as their own. By Simukai Chigudu. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: For Syrians in exile, food is more than a means of sustenance. It is a reminder of the rich and diverse culture being destroyed by civil war. By Wendell Steavenson. Help support our indepe…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: It used to be just a word – now it is a way of life. But is it time to get off the banter bus? By Archie Bland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
Radical new plans to reduce traffic and limit our dependence on cars have sparked bitter conflict. As legal challenges escalate, will Britain’s great traffic experiment be shut down before we have time to see the benefits? By Niamh McIntyre. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: How did a substance that falls from the air, springs from the earth and comes out of your tap become a hyperactive multibillion-dollar business? By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our indepe…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2018: How an extreme libertarian tract predicting the collapse of liberal democracies – written by Jacob Rees-Mogg’s father – inspired the likes of Peter Thiel to buy up property across the Paci…
 
Josiah Elleston-Burrell had done everything to make his dream of studying architecture a reality. But, suddenly, in the summer of 2020, he found his fate was no longer in his hand. By Tom Lamont. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: In a special tribute to Martin Woollacott, the Guardian’s former foreign correspondent and foreign editor, who has died at the age of 81, Alan Rusbridger reflects on his fondest memories of Martin an…
 
Avril Henry lived a fulfilling life, but as age took hold and her body failed, it was one she no longer believed was worth living. Why did the law stand in her way? By Katie Engelhart. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: In 2014, documents alleging a conspiracy to Islamise Birmingham schools were leaked to the media, sparking a national scandal. The papers were debunked – but the story remains as divisive …
 
When a Chinese billionaire bought one of Britain’s most prestigious golf clubs in 2015, dentists and estate agents were confronted with the unsentimental force of globalised capital. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: The Trident debate is not simply about submarines and missiles. It touches almost every anxiety about the identity of the United Kingdom, and could tell us what kind of country – or countr…
 
Swathes of England’s landscape were shaped by the immense block of chalk that has lain beneath it for 100 million years. For a long time, even geologists paid it little heed – but now its secrets and symbolism are being revealed. By Helen Gordon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: Months before she was due to give birth, disaster struck for Katherine Heiny. Doctors ordered her to lie on her side in bed and not move – and gave her a 1% chance of carrying her baby to …
 
Early in Trump’s presidency, emboldened neo-Nazi and fascist groups came out into the open but were met with widespread revulsion. So the tactics of the far right changed, becoming more insidious – and much more successful. By Brendan O’Connor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: since 1958, a small department of Germany’s government has sought to bring members of the Third Reich to trial. A handful of prosecutors are still tracking down Nazis, but the world’s biggest cold-ca…
 
For almost a year our small clinic has been struggling with the horrors of the coronavirus pandemic. So being able to give our staff and most vulnerable patients their first doses of the vaccine has been a real turning point. By Gavin Francis.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
At two months old, Maria Diemar was flown to Sweden to be adopted. Years later, she tracked down her birth mother, who said her baby had been taken against her will. Now investigations are showing that she was one of thousands stolen from their parents. By Aaron Nelsen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Timothy Morton wants humanity to give up some of its core beliefs, from the fantasy that we can control the planet to the notion that we are ‘above’ other beings. His ideas might sound weird, but the…
 
The BBL is the fastest growing cosmetic surgery in the world, despite the mounting number of deaths resulting from the procedure. What is driving its astonishing rise? By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
Few places have seen such turbocharged luxury development as Nine Elms on the London riverside. So why are prices tumbling, investors melting away and promises turning to dust? By Oliver Wainwright. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: The $30bn sex tech industry is about to unveil its biggest blockbuster: a $15,000 robot companion that talks, learns, and never says no. By Jenny Kleeman. Help support our independent jour…
 
The Amazon founder’s relentless quest for ‘customer ecstasy’ made him one of the world’s richest people – now he’s looking to the unlimited resources of space. Is he the genius our age of consumerism deserves? By Mark O’Connell. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
Davon Mayer was a smalltime dealer in west Baltimore who made an illicit deal with local police. When they turned on him, he decided to get out – but escaping that life would not prove as easy as falling into it. By Yudhijit Bhattacharjee. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: Oxford University graduates in philosophy, politics and economics make up an astonishing proportion of Britain’s elite. But has it produced an out-of-touch ruling class? By Andy Beckett. H…
 
In a suburb of Chicago, the world’s first government-funded slavery reparations programme is beginning. Robin Rue Simmons helped make it happen – but her victory has been more than 200 years in the making. By Kris Manjapra. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
After 10 years living in France, I returned to China to sign some papers and I was locked up. For the next two years, I was systematically dehumanised, humiliated and brainwashed. By Gulbahar Haitiwaji with Rozenn Morgat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: These days, every place in the world wants to market its unique identity – and an industry has sprung up to help put them on the map. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent j…
 
Dina Nayeri was just a child when she fled Iran as an asylum seeker. But as she settled into life in the US and then Europe, she became suspicious of the idea that refugees should shed their old identities and be eternally thankful. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: Asunta Fong Yang was adopted as a baby by a wealthy Spanish couple. Aged 12, she was found dead beside a country road. Not long after, her mother and father were arrested. Help support our…
 
She published her first book in her 40s and became the biggest selling author of the past decade in any genre – The Gruffalo alone has sold 13m copies. How did this former busker make it so big? By Oliver Franklin-Wallis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
Britain’s leading ice company makes five billion cubes a year, filling everything from cocktail glasses to ice baths. Now it faces its toughest challenge – for what is ice without a party season? By George Reynolds. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Russia’s role in Trump’s election has led to a boom in Putinology. But do all these theories say more about us than Putin?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
In 1971, an Old Firm derby at Ibrox ended with the death of 66 fans as they celebrated a late goal. John Hodgman survived the terrifying crush and, 50 years on, asks how Rangers avoided taking responsibility. By John Hodgman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodDoor The Guardian
 
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
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