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The MacArthur Memorial produces a podcast on a variety of topics related to the life and times of General Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964). Topics vary and cover subjects related to World War I, World War II, and the Korean War - all designed to give insights into MacArthur's decisions and beliefs. These podcasts also explore the controversies surrounding MacArthur. The MacArthur Memorial is located in Norfolk, VA and is dedicated to preserving and presenting the legacy of General MacArthur and ...
 
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President Truman and General MacArthur had serious disagreements over Korean War policy. MacArthur is often characterized as wanting to use nuclear weapons during that war. Did MacArthur want to use these weapons??? Join Jim Zobel and Amanda Williams as they discuss the archival evidence.Door MacArthur Memorial
 
Dr. William H. Bartsch is one of the great historians of the Pacific War. He holds a PhD in Economics and Middle Eastern Studies, and he worked for the UN for a number of years, all over the world. As he worked, he also indulged his passion for Pacific War history and spent years gathering source materials that form the basis of several seminal wor…
 
It’s been called the textbook operation of World War II. It was the greatest prison rescue ever; over 2000 prisoners of war liberated and not one them or their liberators killed. Unbelievably, the liberation of Los Baños prison camp by the 511th Parachute Regiment and Hunter’s Philippine Guerrillas went largely unheralded. To share the story of thi…
 
From 1919 to 1941, Clark Field in the Philippines was home to American air power in the western part of the Pacific. Attacked by the Japanese at the start of the war and then abandoned in the retreat to Bataan, the airfield was taken over by Japanese troops before being recaptured in 1945. To explore the development and history of Clark Field, we s…
 
On February 13, 2020, the MacArthur Memorial hosted bestselling author Hampton Sides for a discussion of his book On Desperate Ground: The Marines at the Reservoir, the Korean Wars’ Greatest Battle. On Desperate Ground explores the Korean War and a controversial chapter of MacArthur’s career.Door amanda.williams@norfolk.gov
 
Victory Mail - more commonly referred to as V-Mail - was a mail process used by the United States during World War II. It was designed to reduce the weight and fuel costs of mail, while helping citizens correspond with service members stationed overseas. To learn more about V-Mail, we sat down with Lynn Heidelbaugh, curator at the Smithsonian's Nat…
 
General Arthur MacArthur, the father of Douglas MacArthur, traveled to the Philippines in the summer of 1898 and took part in one of the most interesting battles of the Spanish-American War – the land Battle of Manila. The American victory there began the transition of the Philippines from a Spanish colony to an American territory, and ultimately s…
 
History has always been a regular and dependable muse for Hollywood. However, there is always tension between "real" history and "reel" history. The Battle of Midway is an excellent example of this tension and how Hollywood's take on history is influenced by contemporary events and social issues. Recently, we sat down with Dr. Tim Orr to discuss th…
 
Who was Vicente Lim? Dr. Richard Meixsel, author of the book Frustrated Ambition: General Vicente Lim and the Philippine Military Experience, 1910–1944, answers this question with a brief exploration of Lim's life and times. The first Filipino to graduate from West Point, Lim’s military career spanned more than three decades. Although disappointed …
 
At 2:22 p.m. EST on December 7, 1941, Franklin Roosevelt’s Press Secretary, Stephen Early, announced to the press pool: "The Japanese have attacked Pearl Harbor from the air and all naval and military activities on the island of Oahu, principal American base in the Hawaiian islands." Within minutes, millions of Americans were informed of the attack…
 
The American Civil War was an immediate and formative experience for General MacArthur’s parents and their families. General MacArthur even referred to himself as the “reunion of blue and gray personified.” In this special lecture, historian Chris Mackowski tells the story of the Battle of the Wilderness.…
 
The American Civil War was an immediate and formative experience for General MacArthur’s parents and their families. General MacArthur even referred to himself as the “reunion of blue and gray personified.” In this special lecture, historian Dan Welch tells the story of a MacArthur relative, William J. Hardy, who fought with the 1st Richmond Howitz…
 
General MacArthur was a voracious reader. Prior to World War II, he owned thousands of books. He had to leave this library behind when he escaped to Corregidor during the Japanese conquest of the Philippines. Sadly, most of the library was destroyed or looted by the end of World War II. Despite this loss, through gifts and purchases, he was able to…
 
Author Ann Todd discusses her book OSS Operation Black Mail - the story of Elizabeth "Betty" P. McIntosh, who spent eighteen months serving in the Office of Strategic Services in what has been called the "forgotten theater," China-Burma-India. Her craft was black propaganda, and her mission was to demoralize the Japanese through prevarication and d…
 
In 1948, Sibyl Kathigasu became the only Malaysian woman to receive the George Medal for gallantry, the highest civilian honor given by King George VI. Why did she receive such an honor? During World War II she actively resisted the Japanese occupation of what was then British Malaya. As a trained nurse, she provided medical care for members of the…
 
In April 2018, the Memorial hosted a talk by Dr. Frank A. Blazich, Curator of Modern Military History at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and editor of Colonel David L. Hardee's memoir Bataan Survivor: A POW's Account of Japanese Captivity in World War II. Dr. Blazich gave a fascinating talk about Col. Hardee's POW experience.…
 
The Korean War always generates a lot of questions. Did MacArthur really want to use nukes? Did China make use of valuable intelligence from the Cambridge Five? Were Russian pilots engaging American planes on the Yalu River? Why was the air war in Korea so restricted? Or was it? To discuss these questions, the MacArthur Memorial staff sat down with…
 
Ned Almond is regarded as one of the more controversial American generals of World War II and the Korean War. While most historians agree that Almond was talented and had a distinguished combat record, he also openly espoused the idea that black soldiers were less capable than white soldiers. This overt racism has dominated scholarship of his life,…
 
1942 was an eventful year for the United States military. To mark some of the interesting and important events that happened that year, the MacArthur Memorial and the Hampton Roads Naval Museum hosted a 1942" symposium in October 2017. At the symposium, Pete Bulkeley, son of the skipper of PT-41, discussed his father's role in MacArthur's escape fr…
 
In August 2017, Dr. Allen D. Boyer visited the MacArthur Memorial and discussed Rocky Boyer’s War: An Unvarnished History of the Air Blitz that Won the War in the Southwest Pacific. Based on an “unauthorized” diary that was kept by Dr. Boyer’s father, Rocky’ Boyer’s War provides a soldier’s history of General George Kenney’s air war in the Southwes…
 
In June 2017, the MacArthur Memorial, the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, and the VA WWI and WWII Commemoration Commission hosted a symposium to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway. Anthony Tully, co-author of Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway, explored the battle from the Japanese perspective.…
 
In June 2017, the MacArthur Memorial, the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, and the VA WWI and WWII Commemoration Commission hosted a symposium to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway. Elliot Carlson, author of Joe Rochefort's War, discussed how cryptanalysis and intelligence shaped the outcome of the Battle of Midway.…
 
In June 2017, the MacArthur Memorial, the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, and the VA WWI and WWII Commemoration Commission hosted a symposium to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway. Walter Borneman, author of The Admirals and MacArthur at War, kicked off the symposium with an overview of the Pacific War leading up to June 1942.…
 
Peter Eisner, author of MacArthur's Spies, spoke at the MacArthur Memorial in May 2017. MacArthur's Spies tells the story of several people who resisted the Japanese occupation of the Philippines during World War II. Through espionage and sabotage, they helped pave the way for MacArthur's return to the Philippines in 1944.…
 
Bill Lascher, author of Eve of a Hundred Midnights, spoke at the MacArthur Memorial in March 2017. Eve of a Hundred Midnights recounts the meteoric rise of Melville Jacoby, a dashing foreign correspondent who fell in love not only with a country - China - but with Annalee Whitmore, a whip-smart Hollywood scriptwriter-turned journalist. Together the…
 
January 26 marks the birthday of General Douglas MacArthur. It is also Australia Day. On January 26, 2017, the MacArthur Memorial partnered with Air Vice-Marshal Alan Clements, Head of Australian Defense Services (Washington), to mark each of these significant occasions. As part of the program, MacArthur Memorial Archivist James Zobel gave a very s…
 
During World War II, the Japanese recruited dozens of English speaking women to be part of a propaganda broadcast aimed at lowering the morale of Allied troops in the Pacific. The broadcasters would report Japanese successes and describe the overwhelming advantages of Japanese forces. Often these reports were false, and most Allied troops knew it, …
 
Dr. Theresa Kaminski, author of the book Angels of the Underground: The American Women Who Resisted the Japanese in the Philippines in World War II, spoke at the MacArthur Memorial’s 2016 WWII Symposium. During her presentation, Dr. Kaminski explored the lives of four different women who survived the fall of Manila and the several years of Japanese…
 
James Duffy, author of the book War at the End of the World: Douglas MacArthur and the Forgotten Fight for New Guinea, 1942-1945, spoke at the MacArthur Memorial’s 2016 WWII Symposium. During his lecture, Duffy outlined the epic four year fight for New Guinea and explained why New Guinea was one of the most hostile battlefields of the entire war.…
 
Walter Borneman, author of the book MacArthur at War: War in the Pacific, presented his latest research at the MacArthur Memorial’s 2016 WWII Symposium. During his lecture, Borneman traced MacArthur’s evolution as a leader during the war and discussed the General’s mastery of combined operations.Door amanda.williams@norfolk.gov
 
In April 1943, American intelligence officers intercepted the flight plans and travel itinerary of Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. The plans indicated that the admiral would be traveling through zone that could be reached by American fighter planes. Yamamoto was a high level target for a variety of reasons. He had been instrumental in the Pearl …
 
In November 2000, the Memorial's Archivist was asked to look at four letters purportedly written by Douglas MacArthur shortly after World War I. The letters were authenticated and today they provide a window into a previously unknown chapter of MacArthur's life. The letters were written to Herta Heuser, a young German Red Cross worker who helped nu…
 
General MacArthur’s biographers often note that he was regarded with admiration by both John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon. Generally the MacArthur/Nixon relationship is marginalized in MacArthur biographies, while the MacArthur/Kennedy relationship is highlighted. Nixon however had a long history of being publically pro-MacArthur. He even described…
 
Episode Fifty-Nine: The Five-Star Rank (December 2015) On December 14, 1944, Congress approved the creation of the grade of "General of the Army” and “Fleet Admiral.” Over the next two weeks, seven officers in the American Army and Navy were promoted to these newly authorized ranks. The reason for these promotions was simple. American senior comman…
 
When ordered to leave the Philippines in 1942, General MacArthur handpicked a small number of officers to take with him. The “Bataan Gang” as these men were later known, formed the core of his inner circle for the rest of World War II. Major General William Marquat was a member of General Douglas MacArthur’s “Bataan Gang.” A highly decorated office…
 
On October 20, 1944, General Douglas MacArthur waded ashore at Leyte to visit the beachhead U.S. soldiers were in the process of establishing. He was also there to deliver a dramatic radio address to the people of the Philippines announcing that the much anticipated liberation of the islands was underway. Broadcast from the beach (and from a destro…
 
On September 2, 1945, representatives of Japan signed the Instrument of Surrender in a ceremony aboard the USS Missouri. General Douglas MacArthur presided over this carefully orchestrated ceremony as Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers. Many of the Allied nations had expressed dissatisfaction with the secrecy of the evening surrender of Nazi G…
 
Emory Upton is considered one of the most influential reformers of the U.S. Army in American history. He is sometimes referred to as the Army’s version of Alfred Thayer Mahan. A respected combat veteran of the American Civil War, today Upton is remembered for successfully leading infantry against an entrenched enemy and also for suggesting that “ex…
 
As the commander of the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I, John J. Pershing served as a mentor to a generation of generals who later led the United States to victory in World War II. Some of these young officers included: Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar N. Bradley, and George S. Patton. In 2013, U.S.…
 
From the Scottish Highlands to America, General Douglas MacArthur's ancestors have played prominent roles in world history. As the old Scottish adage goes: "there is nothing older, except the hills, MacArtair and the Devil." This podcast tells the story of the MacArthurs from 1200 AD to the birth of Douglas MacArthur and his son.…
 
General Douglas MacArthur reportedly liked Admiral William F. Halsey from the moment he met him – describing him as "blunt, outspoken, [and] dynamic." The feeling was mutual, and Halsey later referred to MacArthur as a lifelong friend. Throughout his long career, Halsey was an enormously popular commander and famously earned his Naval Aviators wing…
 
General MacArthur was a self-proclaimed child of the "Blue and Gray." He grew up hearing stories of his father's exploits with the 24th Wisconsin during the American Civil War and his Virginia born mother idolized Robert E. Lee. From West Point, to engineering assignments, to Mexico, parts of MacArthur's early military career would mimic Lee's earl…
 
Today Jean MacArthur is largely in the shadow of her husband General Douglas MacArthur. By all accounts however, she was a vital member of his inner circle and many of her husband’s biographers considered her an “unusual” but extraordinary woman. Part I covered Mrs. MacArthur’s life up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Part II gives a behind …
 
Today Jean MacArthur is largely in the shadow of her husband General Douglas MacArthur. By all accounts however, she was a vital member of his inner circle and many of her husband’s biographers considered her an “unusual” but extraordinary woman. She came from a family with a deeply rooted tradition of military service and had a great personal inte…
 
Are leaders born or made? Why do places like West Point seem to generate extremely high numbers of business, military, and political leaders? To answer these questions, we sat down with Major Adrienne M. Harrison - a West Point graduate and a veteran of three tours in Iraq. Major Harrison also holds a PhD in History and at the time of this intervie…
 
On October 19, 2014 the MacArthur Memorial, the General Douglas MacArthur Foundation, and the Embassy of the Philippines hosted a special reception to commemorate the October 20, 1944 Leyte Landings. The Memorial's Archivist Jim Zobel gave a short lecture on MacArthur's road back to the Philippines.Door amanda.williams@norfolk.gov
 
On July 24, 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted Mark Perry – author of the book: The Most Dangerous Man in America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur. Perry addressed the Roosevelt/MacArthur relationship and MacArthur’s service during World War II – shedding new light on the General and his legacy.Door amanda.williams@norfolk.gov
 
The seizure of the Admiralty Islands in February 1944 was one of the boldest operations of MacArthur’s Southwest Pacific campaign and perhaps the war in the Pacific. By capturing the islands, the 1st Cavalry Division, U.S. Navy destroyers, and a handful of Seabees ensured that MacArthur would go on to become the Liberator of the Philippines.…
 
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