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Decisions of the Supreme Court, summarized by the court itself.Readings of the Supreme Court slip opinion syllabi, With no personal commentary, you can make up your own mind about the decisions. See Wheaton and Donaldson v. Peters and Grigg, 33 U.S. 591 (1834) and United States v. Detroit Timber & Lumber Co., 200 U.S. 321, 337. Photo by: Davi KellyPaypal:https://paypal.me/SCOTUSsyllabusCash App: $RJDiekenVenmo: RJ-Dieken
 
Brett and Nazim are two attorneys who hate being attorneys. Each week, they discuss current Supreme Court cases with the intent to make the law more accessible to the average person, while ruminating on what makes the law both frustrating and interesting. This podcast is not legal advice and is for entertainment purposes only. If anything you hear leads you to believe you need legal advice, please contact an attorney immediately
 
The Queens Supreme Court podcast is the hilarious spinoff of the hit online series “The Queens Supreme Court” with Ts Madison. The premise of the weekly satirical show is to discuss pop culture and all the hot social media trends, topics and gossip THEN try them as cases, render judgements and sentence the crimes accordingly to determine the ultimate fate of each celebrity!
 
The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law U.S. Supreme Court podcast utilizes faculty experts from specific areas of law to discuss cases decided or pending by the Court, trends in the Court's decisions, or other issues facing the Court. Moritz faculty includes seven former Supreme Court clerks and experts from nearly every area of the law. The podcast is intended for scholars, students, legal professionals and journalists looking for thoughtful and concise commentary on some of the mo ...
 
News, views, and insight on the future of the Supreme Court. The ragtag gang of the usual suspects returns to chat about Justice Kennedy's retirement, and the nomination process to follow. This is the second season of the show following the Garland/Gorsuch* nominations. Following in the footsteps of our prior podcasts, Advice & Consent is insightful, not stodgy… opinionated, but not dogmatic. This is a serious process, but we find some entertainment along the way too. Advice & Consent is an ...
 
KPR Presents is an opportunity to showcase high-profile, thought-provoking lectures, discussions and dialogues recorded throughout the region. There are so many fascinating people who come to this area, everyone from Supreme Court Justice Sonya Sotomayor to syndicated columnist Leonard Pitts. KPR Presents is a great way to share some of those lectures with our listeners. We have also been able to expand the program to cover a broad range of topics, including the Kansas Sesquicentennial, the ...
 
The Supreme Court decides a few dozen cases every year; federal appellate courts decide thousands. So if you love constitutional law, the circuit courts are where it’s at. Join us as we break down some of the week’s most intriguing appellate decisions with a unique brand of insight, wit, and passion for judicial engagement and the rule of law. http://ij.org/short-circuit
 
5-4 is a podcast about how much the Supreme Court sucks. It's a progressive and occasionally profane take on the ideological battles at the heart of the Court's most important landmark cases; an irreverent tour of all the ways in which the law is shaped by politics. Listen each week as hosts Peter, Michael, and Rhiannon dismantle the Justices’ legal reasoning on hot-button issues like affirmative action, gun rights, and campaign finance, and use dark humor to reveal the high court's biases. ...
 
Five-minute bites of background about the Court and Constitution — provides unbiased information and context for fully understanding the Supreme Court and ongoing disputes related to democracy and constitutional law. Learn to appreciate the complexity of constitutional questions, and make more informed decisions as voters and active citizens.
 
The question whether or not gays have the right to marry marches through the courts toward the Supreme Court. Hollywood preaches that children raised with two mommies or two daddies are just fine, and with the new breakthroughs in genetics who needs either a dad or a mom? How did the ultimate Supreme Court Judge get excluded from the discussion? Who do you believe has the right to define marriage and family, and how does all this impact Christ's Family--the Church?
 
Supreme Court dissents have it all: brilliant writing, surprising reasoning, shade, puns, and sometimes historic impact. Although they are necessarily written by the "losing" side, they’re still important: they can provide a roadmap for future challenges or persuade other justices. Sometimes they're just cathartic. In Dissed, attorneys Anastasia Boden and Elizabeth Slattery dig deep into important dissents, both past and present, and reveal the stories behind them. Twitter: @EHSlattery @Anas ...
 
The Supreme Court of the United States is divided, and it's not the first time. For over two centuries, the justices on the nation's highest bench have argued with one another over the direction to take country. From Brown v. Board of Education to Roe v. Wade, the Court has repeatedly transformed American society and remains a polarizing political subject today. And yet no one really talks about what exactly happened in all of these cases. For instance, no one talks about how contraception, ...
 
Where did America come from? What people, ideas, principles, institutions have shaped this country? What do our founding documents mean? Where has America lived up to her potential? Where has she gone wrong? On The Kept Republic Podcast, host Eric Dorman has these critical discussions with experts and writers and thinkers, and even with fellow citizens. The show isn’t really about current events and it doesn’t take cues from who’s in the White House or sitting on the Supreme Court, or from A ...
 
Drama has unfolded in these courtrooms for more than 130 years, from serial murderers and gangland wars to multimillion-dollar commercial disputes and celebrity defamation cases. Take a step behind the bench of one of Australia’s oldest institutions and hear from judges as they explain why they make the decisions they do. Gertie's Law takes a deep dive into some of the lesser-known, misunderstood or complex parts of the court’s work, such as sentencing, mental health, juries and the criminal ...
 
Brought to you by Monnat & Spurrier, Chartered, and hosted by Paige Nichols, Just in Case is a podcast of criminal-law cases just in from the United States Supreme Court, the Tenth Circuit, and the Kansas Appellate Courts. Look for new episodes on the 1st and 3rd Mondays of every month. Contact us at justincasepodcast@gmail.com.
 
The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn’t long before the need for ...
 
This channel is for a “Sanatana-Hindu-Vedic-Arya”. This is providing education and awareness; not entertainment. This talks about views from tradition and lineage. It will cover different Acharayas talks on Spirituality, Scriptures, Nationalism, Philosophy, and Rituals. These collections are not recorded in professional studios using high-end equipment, it is from traditional teachings environment. We are having the objective to spread the right things to the right people for the Sanatana Hi ...
 
Attorney Melaniece Bardley McKnight is originally from Gary, Indiana and the founding partner of Bardley McKnight & Associates, LLC. McKnight attended undergraduate school at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale on a full basketball scholarship where she earned a bachelor’s degree in political science. Attorney McKnight earned a Juris Doctorate degree from North Carolina Central University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina.While pursuing her law degree, McKnight was Secretary of ...
 
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show series
 
For the fifth year in a row the Center for Judicial Engagement travels to the University of North Carolina School of Law to preview the upcoming Supreme Court term. Once again there’s trivia, deep dives on a couple cases about to be argued, and a couple cert petitions. Professor Andy Hessick battles IJ attorney Justin Pearson for top SCOTUS trivia …
 
The lower court ruled the department of health and human services lacked the authority to continue the eviction moratorium after Congress did not extend it. The lower court, however, stayed enforcement of that order, The Supreme Court, in this case, lifted the stay which ends the eviction moratorium. Support the show (https://paypal.me/SCOTUSsyllab…
 
This week, Joel and Mackenzie jump back into the legal news as the Supreme Court summer break comes to an end. First, Joel and Mackenzie address the legality of vaccine mandates. They question whether a mandate at this point is an effective solution. They also review the California recall vote for Gov. Newsom. Finally, they turn the the Supreme Cou…
 
In this Season 2 opener, we're once again celebrating Constitution Day! The justices discuss timely issues around state constitutions, like redistricting after the recent census. The women also discuss the most recent amendments to the constitutions in their states. Plus, what happens when states interpret the same general language in their constit…
 
This weekend marks the 20th anniversary of 9/11, and as the withdrawal from Afghanistan dominates the headlines, so does the conversation about the forever war and its implications. Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Baher Azmy, the legal director of the Center for Constitutional Rights. Azmy has been challenging the U.S. government repeatedly over the p…
 
Comedian of Law is back after a summer break! Joel Oster and Mackenzie Smith kick off the episode with a story involving a spaghetti-covered domestic dispute. They talk about worst day in the courtroom in light of Elon Musk's lawyer vomiting in the jury box. Joel and Mackenzie talk Supreme Court, the new Texas abortion law, and what to expect movin…
 
Introducing a new segment to the Comedian of Law podcast: Courtroom Quarterback. As a massive sports fan, Joel Oster is bringing his humorous legal takes to the sports arena. Joel is joined by fellow sports fanatic and legal professional, Christopher Marohn. Joel and Chris will review major athletics news, discuss the GOATs, and debrief where games…
 
Urgent times call for urgent conversations as Professor Michele Goodwin and Rebecca Traister join Dahlia Lithwick for an emergency Amicus to discuss what’s new and what’s very old about SB 8, the law that allowed Texas to functionally overturn Roe v Wade. They also unpack what it really means when five justices on the Supreme Court hold up their ha…
 
Ever rolled your tires to try and cover up the meter maid’s chalk mark? No, me neither . . . But even if you haven’t, you might not have to worry about tire chalk marks much longer. Josh Windham explains how the Sixth Circuit has said that’s an unreasonable search. And out West it turns out there’s so much law in Yellowstone National Park (the Wyom…
 
Dahlia Lithwick is joined by My Name Is Pauli Murray directors, Betsy West and Julie Cohen, and by Professor Patricia Bell-Scott, a consulting producer on the film and professor emerita of women’s studies and human development and family science at the University of Georgia. Professor Bell-Scott’s biography, The Firebrand and the First Lady: Portra…
 
The Third Circuit allowed a Second Amendment case challenging Robinson Township’s new zoning ordinance to proceed. Did they town change their zoning laws just to prevent a gun club from fulling opening? Possibly, we’ll have to wait and see. But in the meantime, Andrew Ward walks us through this decision exploring just which level of scrutiny applie…
 
Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Professor Michael Heller, one of the authors of Mine! How the Hidden Rules of Ownership Control Our Lives, for the latest installment of Amicus’ summer season of episodes exploring books and films about the law. Podcast production by Sara Burningham. Sign up for Slate Plus now to listen and support our show. Learn more …
 
Usually a “chill” on your freedom of speech is the easiest constitutional injury to prove. But in the Tenth Circuit it seems if you speak too much you’re not “chilled,” and therefore not “injured,” even if you’re breaking an unconstitutional law. Adam Shelton walks us through this chilling brain teaser. Meanwhile, when is competition “unfair”? Alex…
 
With an episode title like this, you know its a party. This week's grab-bag episode covers cases regarding bankruptcy law (City of Chicago v. Fulton), immigration law (Pereida v. Wilkson), and admin law (Yellen v. Collins), all while discussing nu metals favorite sons. Not only does the law start at (07:40), but we don't even hit the into until (02…
 
More on two of America’s favorite subjects this week. Josh House rejoins us as we analyze six separate opinions about one football coach. Josh last came on in the spring when the Ninth Circuit said the coach didn’t have a prayer. Although that ruling stands for now, a number of judges recently exercised their freedom to speak differently. And maybe…
 
This week's episode previews the biggest case of next year's term, Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, in which the State of Mississippi has asked the newly-formed Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade. Brett and Nazim discuss a bit of the background of Roe and consider possible outcomes of the Dobbs decision. Law starts at (09:40), and d…
 
Continuing Amicus’ summer season of deep dives into books, films, and ideas beyond the confines of the Supreme Court chamber, Dahlia Lithwick is joined by historian and chair of African American studies at Emory University professor Carol Anderson to talk about her book The Second. They discuss the long anti-Black history of gun laws in the United …
 
This week, Joel and Mackenzie Smith talk about the latest updates on Britney Spears, travel, and recent Supreme Court news. They discuss the legal definition of conservatorship and the permanent nature of the situation. Joel and Mackenzie break down the law on control over medical decisions under conservatorship and Britney's birth control. They al…
 
On a special Short Circuit we look at the Constitution, and the constitutional history, of the Golden State. With two state constitutions and conventions in its history, and a multitude of ballot measures amending the state’s highest law, the story of the California Constitution is a turbulent, dynamic, and fascinating look at how constitutions get…
 
This week's episode covers Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Bonta, in which the Supreme Court struck down a law which required charitable organizations to disclose their major donors. Brett and Nazim discuss the ideological split on the Court and what it means to be "conservative" in this day and age. No time stamp because this all killer, no…
 
The Supreme Court has said a “search” occurs when the police invade your “reasonable expectation of privacy.” So what is a “reasonable expectation” to be free from video surveillance in a world where everyone has a camera, everywhere? Rob Frommer tells us the Seventh Circuit says there basically is no such thing as long as what you’re doing can be …
 
Take it!! This week's episode covers Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid, in which the Supreme Court struck down a California law that allowed access to union organizers on private property. Brett and Nazim discuss the implications of the 6-3 ideological split, but also shellfish and roller coasters. Law starts at (07:30).…
 
In the first of Amicus’ summer season of conversations, Dahlia Lithwick tackles one of the major challenges of this moment: how to fix American democracy. Dahlia is joined by the Nation’s Elie Mystal and former chief of staff for Sen. Harry Reid and author of Kill Switch, Adam Jentleson. In a discussion that was taped as part of the Crosscut Festiv…
 
Being a state Supreme Court justice is about much more than writing opinions on important cases. Justices are also responsible for overseeing the court system in their state. Part of this usually involves finding a passion and trying to affect change where they think it’s needed, whether that’s working to help children in foster care, studying the …
 
Today we think of the Equal Protection Clause as requiring equal treatment of the laws. But in addition to anything else it covers, at its core it’s supposed to protect, well, equal protection. Yet if you bring a claim that you’re not being protected equally the courts generally have little to offer. However, civil rights attorney Laura Schauer Ive…
 
This week's episode covers Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee, where in one corner, we have Justice Alito upholding two Arizona voting laws, and the other corner, we have Big Sexy Paddington Prince Nazim advocating for the good people of Arizona. Good luck to both competitors. Law starts at (03:30).…
 
It’s not often that we get three different appellate opinions on the same issue in one week. But recently the Fifth Circuit (twice) and the Tenth handed down their thoughts on mandatory bar associations and the First Amendment. Those are groups that lawyers in some states must join—and pay for—in order to work as licensed attorneys. The Supreme Cou…
 
This week's episode covers two Constitutional law cases, Lange v. California (how the hot pursuit exception applies to misdemeanors) and Mahanoy School District v. B.L. (holding that the First Amendment prevents school districts from disciplining out of school speech). From a big picture perspective, Brett and Nazim discuss what history teaches us …
 
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