Science And Medicine openbaar
[search 0]
Meer

Download the App!

show episodes
 
The Women in Science and Medicine podcast features discussions with female scientists within West Virginia University and other institutions. In this series, we’ll share the achievements and insights from some of the country’s top female scientists and learn from their experiences to understand how they came to be passionate about science and overcame any obstacles in their paths. This podcast is offered by West Virginia University’s Office of Research and Graduate Education.
 
With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features the permanent exhibition “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Change the World.” It includes galleries devoted to astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light. In lectures and interviews, curators and s ...
 
Join cohosts Kendall Britt, MD and Amy Rogers, MD for a 15 minute check-up on current issues in medicine and health policy. The doctors examine current medical concerns in light of the best available medical evidence and the policy issues of the day with a focus on their impact on the doctor patient relationship.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Neuroscientist Sergiu P. Pasca has made it his life's work to understand how the human brain builds itself -- and what makes it susceptible to disease. In a mind-blowing talk laden with breakthrough science, he shows how his team figured out how to grow "organoids" and what they call brain "assembloids" -- self-organizing clumps of neural tissue de…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Dr Gary Gilkeson from the Medical University of South Carolina about a phase I trial into the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in refractory lupus patients in the USA, following impressive results of clinical improvement resulting from this therapy in China. The trial indicated that…
 
Your closet is likely full of all kinds of materials -- leather, cotton, nylon and polyester, to name a few -- that contribute to fashion's sustainability crisis. Biomaterials investigator Dan Widmaier explains how we could look to nature for sustainable replacements for these much-used materials and introduces a leather alternative made from mushr…
 
The universe that we know, with its luminous stars and orbiting planets, is largely made up of elements we can't actually see -- like dark energy and dark matter -- and therefore don't fully understand. Theoretical physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein takes us inside the search for this cosmos-shaping invisible matter and explains how, with the help …
 
A curious, quiet revolution of sound has taken over the internet. Physiologist Craig Richard explains the soothing brain science of Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR), tracking its rise in popularity and why this fascinating phenomenon is so relaxing to millions of people around the world.Door Craig Richard
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Dr Peter Izmirly from New York University and Dr Elizabeth Ferucci from the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, both in the USA. They discuss the establishment of a network of population-based lupus patient registries in the USA and how these have been used to estimate the incidence r…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Professor Ronald van Vollenhoven from the Amsterdam University Medical Centers in the Netherlands and Dr Cynthia Aranow from the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in New York, USA. They discuss the efforts of the DORIS international task force to agree on a single definition of rem…
 
Linking together the histories of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Edwin Hubble and Tracy K. Smith, poet and thinker Maria Popova crafts an astonishing story of how humanity came to see the edge of the observable universe. (Followed by an animated excerpt of "My God, It's Full of Stars," by Tracy K. Smith)Door Maria Popova
 
In this episode, Mallory talks with Dr. Louise Risher, Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University Dr. Risher discusses her research in studying the long-term effects of binge drinking on the brains of adolescents, her love for curiosity and science, and the challenges facing you…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America talks to Dr Cristina Drenkard from Emory University and Dr Teresa Brady from Clarity Consulting and Communications, both based in Atlanta, USA. They discuss their paper on the relationship between levels of self-efficacy and health behaviours and outcomes in black women with SLE. Their study specifi…
 
The secret behind medicine that uses messenger RNA (or mRNA) is that it "teaches" our bodies how to fight diseases on our own, leading to groundbreaking treatments for COVID-19 and, potentially one day, cancer, the flu and other ailments that have haunted humanity for millennia. RNA researcher Melissa J. Moore -- Moderna's chief scientific officer …
 
Building a pandemic-free future won't be easy, but Bill Gates believes that we have the tools and strategies to make it possible -- now we just have to fund them. In this forward-looking talk, he proposes a multi-specialty Global Epidemic Response and Mobilization (GERM) team that would detect potential outbreaks and stop them from becoming pandemi…
 
Given the scale of the challenge, the conversation around climate change is often tinged with doom and gloom. But climate tech investor Gabriel Kra thinks we need to reframe the crisis as a source of tremendous opportunity. He offers five big reasons to be optimistic about climate -- starting with the fact that many of the world's best minds are fo…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America talks to Dr Sylvia Kamphuis and Dr Javad Wahadat from the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam in the Netherlands about aiming for a Low Lupus Disease Activity State (LLDAS) in children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). They outline the difference between LLDAS and clinical remission (CR), and…
 
Under the sea, untold wonders await in the form of untapped medicinal potential. Chemist Sam Afoullouss dives into the science behind natural remedies, explaining why the ocean's great (and still largely unexplored) biodiversity is ideal for deriving and inspiring future treatments -- if we protect its waters and the marine life within them.…
 
Scientists have long known that cows are a huge source of the greenhouse gas methane, contributing up to four percent of emissions globally. But could there be a way to make cattle less -- ahem -- gassy? Animal scientist Ermias Kebreab talks through an ingenious solution to reduce methane-rich cow burps by feeding cattle something growing below the…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Professor Iryna Kulyk from Indiana University in the USA and Professor Martin Kriegel from the University of Münster in Germany and Yale University in the USA. They discuss their study, presented at the Lupus 21st Century conference in September 2021, on the influence of the consumption o…
 
In this episode, Mallory talks with Dr. Nicquet Blake, Vice Provost of Student Academic Affairs and Dean of the Graduate Division at the University of California-San Francisco. Dr. Blake discusses her passion for diversity in education, the benefits of holistic admissions, and the potential long-term impacts the pandemic will have on our entire edu…
 
Could we use the energy from light and sound to detect disease? TED Fellow Lei Li shares the exciting promise of photoacoustic imaging: an affordable, painless and accurate method of converting light into sound in order to create high-resolution images of what's going on inside our bodies. From early detection of breast cancer to steering medicine-…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Dr Erik Anderson and Dr Meggan Mackay from the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research in New York in the USA. They discuss their study into imbalances in quinolinic acid and kynurenic acid levels in the brain in SLE patients, and propose that the ratio between these two metabolites cou…
 
What if we could use brain waves to treat Alzheimer's? Professor and neuroscientist Li-Huei Tsai details a promising new approach to artificially stimulate gamma brain waves using light and sound therapy, to increase connectivity and synchrony and delay the onset of this deadly disease. This non-invasive therapy has already been shown to work in mi…
 
In this episode, Mallory chats with Dr. Karen Frank, Chief of Laboratory Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Frank shares details about her career and insights into challenges young women can face in careers like hers, as well as strategic ways to overcome them. She also shares beneficial insights focused on networking and mentoring …
 
Biochar is a kind of charcoal that removes CO2 from the atmosphere, helping yield healthy crops and even producing abundant renewable energy in the form of electricity as it's made. This exciting climate change fighter is ready for scaling now. Entrepreneur Axel Reinaud outlines three ways to make this material more accessible to farmers -- so that…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Jennifer He from the University of Western Ontario in Canada about her research into using neuropsychological battery tests to determine the degree of cognitive dysfunction in lupus patients. A high degree of variability in performance across multiple tests (a high dispersion score) is as…
 
A king cobra has enough venom to kill 10 people in a single bite. Recounting his near-death experience after being bitten by one of these majestic yet deadly snakes, conservationist and TED Fellow Gowri Shankar shares the epiphany he had when the antivenom failed: there's more than one unique species of king cobra.…
 
In this episode, Mallory talks with Dr. Melissa Lewis, Assistant Professor in the University of Missouri’s School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Lewis shares details about her fascinating work in partnering with indigenous people to enhance their healthcare and how she is also working with healthcare communities to pr…
 
Floods, droughts, heat waves and cold blasts -- why is the weather becoming more extreme? Environmentalist and "America's weatherman" Al Roker discusses the link between climate change and disruptions to weather patterns worldwide, followed by a conversation between Nobel laureate Al Gore and TED science curator David Biello about the science of ex…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Francisca Lambert-Fliszar and Dr Evelyne Vinet from McGill University Health Centre in Canada. They discuss monitoring 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) metabolite levels to enable personalisation of immunosuppressive therapies prior to conception or during pregnancy, in order to most effectively a…
 
Refrigerators do much more than store your groceries -- they're also vital to preserving and distributing vaccines. Illustrating the realities of (and threats to) global vaccine supply chains, technologist and TED Fellow Nithya Ramanathan describes how smart sensors placed in fridges that store medical supplies can provide crucial, real-time data a…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Dr Jim Oates from the Medical University of South Carolina and Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center in Charleston, USA. They discuss his paper on developing risk prediction models in lupus nephritis to predict outcomes at the point of diagnosis, which can be used as a decision support tool …
 
What if you could eat chicken nuggets without harming a chicken? It's possible through "cellular agriculture," says Isha Datar. In a talk about cutting-edge science, she explains how this new means of food production makes it possible to eat meat without the negative consequences of industrial farming -- and how it could fundamentally change our fo…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Dr Ronald von Vollenhoven, one of LSM's Editors-in-Chief, about the highlights of the 14th International Congress on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (LUPUS 2021) and the 6th International Congress on Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity (CORA). These events were held jointly as a v…
 
Your belly and your brain speak to each other, says obesity researcher Mads Tang-Christensen. Offering scientific proof that obesity is a disease influenced by genetics and the environment, he introduces a molecule discovered in both the brain and gut that helps control appetite -- and which could be engineered to promote healthy weight loss for th…
 
Duane Peters from the Lupus Foundation of America interviews Dr Jill Buyon, one of LSM's Editors-in-Chief, and Dr Philip Carlucci from New York University in the USA, a previous recipient of the LFA's Gina M. Finzi Memorial Student Summer Fellowship. They discuss their recent paper on the safety of kidney biopsies in patients with SLE enrolled in t…
 
Get transported on a stunningly rendered, sci-fi safari through Planet City: an imaginary metropolis of 10 billion people, from the brain of director and architect Liam Young. Explore the potential outcomes of an urban space designed to house the entire population of the earth -- and imagine answers to what is possible, and what is sustainable, for…
 
Loading …

Korte handleiding

Google login Twitter login Classic login