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The richly diverse and fascinating world of culture and politics of the Middle East and North Africa, exploring the complex web of class, gender, ethnic, religious and regional differences which separate and distinguish the ways of life and political and ideological perspectives of people in that part of the world. Co-hosted by Malihe and Mira.
 
Voices of the Middle East and North Africa is a weekly program hosted by Malihe Razazan and Mira Nabulsi. It explores the richly diverse and fascinating world of culture and politics of the Middle East and North Africa through a complex web of class, gender, ethnic, religious and regional differences. Voices of the Middle East and North Africa airs on KPFA radio, 94.1 FM, in Berkeley, CA. Online on kpfa.org or on Apple Podcasts.
 
Established in September 2018, the Institute of Middle Eastern Studies draws together staff and students from across King’s College London working on the Middle East and North Africa. Based in a dozen departments, its over 30 faculty members produce world-class research on every country in the region. They are routinely asked by policy makers, civil society groups and media outlets both in the UK and elsewhere to provide expert analysis on events and developments in this important part of th ...
 
Each week Andrew Parasiliti, president of the award-winning news site Al-Monitor, and Amberin Zaman, Al-Monitor’s Senior Correspondent, interview newsmakers, journalists and thought leaders from the US and Middle East about the latest news and trends in the region. Andrew has been writing about, and traveling in, the Middle East for over three decades, meeting and interviewing the region’s top political and civil society leaders. Since obtaining his PH.D from Johns Hopkins University, he has ...
 
بودكاست اخباري يناقش ويتابع مستجدات الاحداث في تونس والعالم العربي ساعة بساعة مع الصحفي والاعلامي محمود الحرشاني.شعارنا احترام المستمع وشفافية الخبر .التعليق حر والخبر مقدس
 
The great North African polymath Abd ar-Raḥmān Ibn Khaldūn once observed "The past resembles the future more than one drop of water resembles another." That sentiment guides the spirit of this bimonthly podcast on Islamic History for the contemporary Muslim mind, we will explore themes of continuity, change and evolution. Join us on this journey as we seek to answer the question "What can past teach us about the present?"
 
Sabc News North West provides a platform that extends news coverage beyond television and radio. It adds to the presence of the SABC News brand on digital platforms to be on par with the rest of the world. The news are generated SABC journalists in the North West province but is not limited to the province. Our footprint spreads across several provinces and our stories reflect as such.
 
Clinical research and clinical trial management form the backbone of drug and device approvals worldwide. Learn from the leading industry experts to build and advance your clinical research career. You'll hear from sponsors, clinical research organizations, and clinical trial sites around the globe. This show is for all current and aspiring clinical research professionals including clinical research associates (CRA), clinical operations managers, study managers, biostatisticians, medical doc ...
 
African History stories are seldom told; in cases where they do get told, it is seldom by Africans themselves. The African Camp Fire Stories’ Podcast is created and narrated by natives of the continent. It is very important for us to note that we are not professional Historians. And we appreciate very much the work that Historians have done in covering the stories that we make use on this podcast. The objective of the podcast is to bring to the fore African history in an engaging, interestin ...
 
UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch is the state’s premier literary series, bringing the Tar Heel State’s best and brightest Southern writers to the small screen. In every illuminating interview, host D.G. Martin sheds light on authors’ lives, books and the state’s indelible imprint on their works. D.G. Martin has hosted North Carolina Bookwatch since the series’ third season in 1999. A Yale Law School graduate and former Green Beret, Martin has been involved with public service, and politics ...
 
"A Way Home Together: Stories of the Human Journey" tells stories of people on the move from different cultures and countries. In our first two episodes, host Ahmed Badr, a refugee from Iraq speaks to his parents and 14-year-old sister about his family's journey. Other early episodes feature young refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa, who now live in North America. Their voices, laughter and emotional honesty are examples of how "A Way Home Together" can help build a new nar ...
 
Mythology extends past the Greek and Roman pantheon, and European fairy tales are only one section in the worldwide folklore lexicon. Every other Monday, join your host Gree, long time folk tale fan and short time global studies scholar, as we delve into stories from traditionally overlooked cultures from all over the planet. If you’re interested in hearing about myths and fables and legends from civilizations that have honed storytelling over thousands of years, “Colored Folklore” is the po ...
 
ANCA Radio, Autistic People, People First is a Naturally Autistic® ANCA® radio show, created to educate the public about our growing Global Autistic Community. Our shows celebrate the diversity, strength and talents of a once misunderstood and marginalized group of people. The shows are educational, artistic, informative and cultural. Our hosts broadcast live from Canada, Australia, and the USA. Our listening audience is from Asia Pacific region, North & South America, Europe, the Middle Eas ...
 
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show series
 
When the Palestinian Nakba (or the catastrophe of 1948) is discussed it's commonly understood to refer to the destruction of villages and the displacement of about 700 thousand Palestinians. What gets left out is what happened to the people who remained in the borders of what became Israel and the transformations the new state created on the land, …
 
The president has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. It is clear that the country needed a shake-up in its hidebound politics—but is this the right way? A sprawling trial starting today involving the most senior Catholic-church official ever indicted is sure to cast light on the Vatican’s murky finances. And how climate change is a…
 
As the country tests a bold reopening strategy in the face of the Delta variant, our political editor charitably characterises the prime minister’s tenure as a mixed bag. Hong Kong’s national-security law has now come for its universities, sending shudders through the territory’s last bastion of pro-democracy fervour. And why the alcohol-free beer …
 
On 1 October 1964, the fastest train the world had ever seen was launched in Japan. The first Shinkansen, or bullet train, ran between Tokyo and Osaka, and had a top speed of 210km per hour. Lucy Burns spoke to Isao Makibayashi, one of the train's first drivers.This is a rebroadcast(Photo: Shinkansen, or bullet train. Credit: Keystone/Getty Images)…
 
Courage, corruption, culture and competition – all major factors in the life and times of the first women’s football team in Somalia and its inspirational young coach, Shaima Sellal. The government gave the go-ahead for a women’s team in 1994, but it did not take off because of the continuing civil war. Football can be a casualty of the conflict in…
 
This is episode 24, the Foundation of the Xhosa Kingdom, the heroes Tshawe and Phalo. I’ve made use of a number of books and documents in the series so far, but Jeff Perez’s House of Phalo is probably my favourite source material mainly because he lectured me at Rhodes University in the mid-1980s. His book on the Xhosa is still the go-to research d…
 
Tokyo is under a state of emergency; covid-19 cases are piling up. But for Japan, a super-spreader event is just one of the potential costs of this year’s games. We ask why Britain’s government has essentially given amnesty to those involved in Northern Ireland’s decades of deadly violence. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of an Ausch…
 
Arab Digest editor William Law is in conversation with the North Africa expert Francis Ghilès, an associate senior researcher at the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs (CIDOB). Their economies, their governments, the repression of critics and journalists, relations with France and the Western Sahara affair all feature in a wide-ranging over…
 
It seems ever more certain that global temperatures will sail past limits set in the Paris Agreement. We examine what a world warmed by 3°C would—or will—look like. Our correspondent speaks with Sudan’s three most powerful men; will they act in concert or in conflict on the way to democracy? And why Liverpool has been booted from UNESCO’s world-her…
 
In the early 2000s, rebels in Sudan's Darfur region took up arms against the government. In response, the Khartoum regime launched a scorched earth campaign along ethnic lines. The Sudanese military allied to a local militia, the Janjaweed, laid waste to villages across the region, killing and raping as they went. Some 300,000 people are believed t…
 
On the face of it, the streaming giant’s quarterly results were lacklustre. But our media editor explains why its international growth looks promising, and how it is spreading its bets. A largely uncontested purge of LGBT accounts from China’s social-media platform WeChat reveals much about a growing Chinese-nationalist narrative online. And why re…
 
On 22 July 2011 Norway suffered its worst terror attacks in recent history. A far-right extremist, Anders Breivik, launched a bomb attack on government offices in Oslo, and then, two hours later, attacked a summer camp for young political activists on the island of Utøya, 38 kms from the Norwegian capital. In total 77 people were killed that day - …
 
The European Union, NATO and the “Five Eyes” intelligence partners have all joined America in accusing China’s government of involvement in hacking campaigns. Now what? Away from the spectacle of billionaires’ race to the heavens, many African countries are establishing space programmes—with serious innovation and investment opportunities on the gr…
 
In 1941, Italian colonial rule in East Africa ended when Mussolini’s soldiers made a dramatic final stand in the northern Ethiopian town of Gondar. After a bloody battle, General Guglielmo Nasi surrendered to troops from the British empire and Ethiopian fighters loyal to Emperor Haile Selassie. Simon Watts listens to an account in the BBC archive f…
 
Al-Monitor columnist Ali Hashem discusses why incoming Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi may not give priority to closing the nuclear deal; why Iran sees an opportunity in Afghanistan; the complex relationships among Iraqi militias and the Iranian government; whether Iran’s policies toward Syria, Lebanon, and the Palestinians are likely to change; an…
 
Disaster-recovery efforts continue, even as heavy rains continue in many places. The tragedy brings climate change to the fore, with political implications particularly in Germany. Syria’s oppressive regime is short of cash, so it has apparently turned to trafficking in an increasingly popular party drug. And why kelp farms are bobbing up along Ame…
 
Colored Folklore, Volume 3: Sun Mythology Episode 19: Indigenous Australians - Oceanic Cultures Story Bila Bila, Sun Goddess Sun Goddesses Australian Pantheon Gnowee Myths and Folklore Goddess Gnowee Solar Goddess Credits Sound (via Envato Elements): Outback Thunder, by JBlanks Australian Outback, by Purpleplanet Music (via Music Vine): Mr. Mischie…
 
Ground-breaking legislation came into effect in Brazil in 2006. For the first time the courts were ordered to recognise different forms of domestic violence. The 'Maria da Penha law' was named after a women's rights activist who was left paralysed by her abusive husband. Maria told Mike Lanchin her chilling story. This programme is a rebroadcast. P…
 
This is episode 23 and its time to shift our attention away from the Dutch in the Cape to the amaXhosa. At the turn of the 18th Century there were signs of increased conflict in the region as the Khoekhoe began to feel the pressures of the expanding Dutch settlements which spread out from the southern Cape. The boundaries of the territory occupied …
 
Bank bosses are jubilant: revenues were down but profits way up. We look at the pandemic-driven reasons behind the windfall, and ask how long their influence may last. A thicket of conflicting laws is complicating Jamaica’s plans to enter the wider medical-marijuana market. And our critic reports from a slimmed-down Cannes film festival. For full a…
 
In the summer of 2001 race riots gripped towns in the north of England. They began in Oldham in late May 2001, spreading to Burnley in June, and Bradford in July. All had their own specific local triggers, but all involved clashes between men of white and of South Asian background. A report into the violence found communities were living in complet…
 
Arab Digest editor William Law is in conversation with Jon Alterman, a senior vice president at Washington's Center for Strategic and International Studies. The focus is on President Biden and his administration's Middle East efforts. He inherited several challenges from the chaotic Trump years, not least to repair America's diplomatic standing in …
 
Widespread looting and the worst violence since apartheid continue, exposing ethnic divisions and the persistent influence of Jacob Zuma, a former president. How to quell the tensions? As some countries administer third covid-19 “booster shots” we ask about the epidemiological and moral cases for and against them. And the bids to reverse the declin…
 
Taliban fighters first took control of Afghanistan's capital city Kabul in late September 1996. They imposed their strict interpretation of Islam on Afghans, outlawing music and TV, banning the education of girls, and requiring men to grow beards. The Taliban ruled most of Afghanistan until 2001 when, following the 9/11 attacks against America, a U…
 
Shadyar Omrani is a journalist, Poet, Novelist, Researcher and Public Lecturer. https://twitter.com/shadyaromrani?lang=enResources: https://iranhumanrights.org/2021/06/oil-industry-workers-go-on-national-strike-in-iran/https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/iran-oil-strikes-contract-workers-engulf-industry…
 
The state’s Democratic lawmakers have fled to Washington, stymieing a voting-rights bill. We examine the growing state-level, bare-knuckle fights on voting rights across the country. Ransomware attacks just keep getting bolder, more disruptive, more sinister; what structural changes could protect industries and institutions from attack? And Britain…
 
Between 2006 and 2011, a high-stakes negotiated prisoner exchange took place between Israel and Hamas, the group that governs the Gaza Strip. During that time, the two sides did not have any direct contact, so mediators from Egypt, Germany and Ireland were involved. At stake were the terms of exchange between one captured Israeli soldier, Gilad Sha…
 
In the 1960s a young Englishwoman made a discovery that changed our understanding of animal behaviour. Jane Goodall was living among wild chimpanzees in Tanzania when she observed them using sticks and grasses as tools to get food. Farhana Haider spoke to her about her life in 2014.This programme is a rebroadcast.(Photo: Jane Goodall with chimpanze…
 
As Turkey negotiates the terms of retaining its forces at Kabul airport with Washington many air concerns that Turkish troops will be imperilled in the wake of the US withdrawal. The Taliban is wresting back control of much of the country as Afghan government troops flee their positions with some seeking refuge in neighboring Tajikistan. The Taliba…
 
Which carriers will thrive? Long-haulers or short-hoppers? The no-frills or the glitzy? The bailed-out or the muddled-through? Our industry editor scans the skies. Record numbers of Latin American migrants heading for America’s southern border mask another trend: many are stopping and making a home in Mexico. And Japan’s storied but declining publi…
 
As a schoolboy in communist China, Kim Gordon took part in huge rallies to praise Chairman Mao. But when Mao's so-called Cultural Revolution began to target intellectuals and foreigners, Kim's British parents came under suspicion despite being convinced communists. When they tried to leave the country they were arrested with Kim and locked up in a …
 
Food shortages are nothing new. But it has been decades since shelves have been so empty—and since Cubans took to the streets in such numbers. Richard Branson’s space jaunt was intended to mark the start of a space-tourism industry; we examine its prospects. And why, despite last night’s disappointment, England’s football fans should be hopeful abo…
 
Using eyewitness recordings from the BBC archive we hear from the pioneers of the jet engine, Sir Frank Whittle and Hans von Ohain, about the struggle to develop a revolutionary new engine in the 1930s. An invention which would change the world. Photo: Sir Frank Whittle (1907-1996) is pictured here with the Whittle WV engine at the Science Museum i…
 
This is episode 22 and we’re dealing with a number of things. First is the arrival in the Cape of an influential Muslim Cleric called Sheik Yusufs al-Taj al-Khwalwari al-Maqasari who was to have a major impact on the colony. We’ll also hear about what was going on across southern Africa in the first two decades of the 18th Century – a time of major…
 
The world’s youngest state was born amid boundless optimism. But poverty is still endemic and ethnic tensions still rule politics; what hope for its next decade? Mass graves found at Canada’s “residential schools” have sparked a reckoning about past abuses of indigenous peoples. And marking 50 years since the final album of Karen Dalton, the forgot…
 
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