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Gardens are more than collections of plants. Gardens and Gardeners are intersectional spaces and agents for positive change in our world. Cultivating Place: Conversations on Natural History and the Human Impulse to Garden is a weekly public radio program & podcast exploring what we mean when we garden. Through thoughtful conversations with growers, gardeners, naturalists, scientists, artists and thinkers, Cultivating Place illustrates the many ways in which gardens are integral to our natura ...
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
The Natural History of Chocolate being a Distinct and Particular Account of the Cocoa-tree, its Growth and Culture, and the Preparation, Excellent Properties, and Medicinal Virtues of its Fruit. Wherein the Errors of those who have wrote upon this Subject are discovered; the Best Way of Making Chocolate is explained; and several Uncommon Medicines drawn from it, are communicated. - Summary by D. de Quelus
 
With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features the permanent exhibition “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Change the World.” It includes galleries devoted to astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light. In lectures and interviews, curators and s ...
 
Children are full of curiosity and questions about the world. Each Friday, join Molly Oldfield, the very first question writer (or QI Elf) on the BBC TV show QI and author of four books as she answers questions - with the help of experts from Neil Gaiman, Heston Blumenthal, Grayson Perry, Lauren Child, Richard Branson and Sophie Dahl to the fish curators at the Natural History Museum - sent into the show by children around the world. If you're a kid - big or small - with questions you want a ...
 
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Rusty Hinges

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Rusty Hinges

Basement Fort Productions LLC

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The world can be a mysterious place. It can also be a boring place, so let’s focus on the mysterious. Rusty Hinges is a podcast that explores mysteries, hoaxes, natural phenomena, and weird history. Basically, anything that’s a bit… hinky.
 
Hudson traveled to Patagonia to study the birds, but shortly upon arrival accidentally shot himself in the knee, requiring a lengthy period of idleness to recover, hence the title of the book. It's not just a work of ornithology, but a personal memoir of the people and natural history of Patagonia. - Summary by Kevin Davidson
 
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So Hot Right Now

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So Hot Right Now

4th Floor Creative & Picture Zero

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Maandelijks
 
To save the world we need to change the story. Nature and the climate are in crisis. To survive we must use our most powerful tool - communication. Telling these stories can be difficult and dangerous. But done right they can change the world. Join environmental journalist Lucy Siegle (The Guardian, The One Show) and wildlife filmmaker Tom Mustill (Greta Thunberg/#NatureNow & BBC Natural History Unit) as they learn how to communicate better, from those who do it best. Legendary broadcaster S ...
 
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Inside Out & About

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Inside Out & About

Friends of the Chicago River

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Join Friends of the Chicago River on a journey along the Chicago River system for an exploration of our river, natural areas, local wildlife and history, and meet people locally and nationally who are helping bring these amazing places to life. Complemented by programming which can be found on Friends’ website at chicagoriver.org, Inside, Out & About includes a myriad of experiences, art, music, interviews, tours, family activities at home and outside— and we hope it will inspire your sense ...
 
The Lāna‘i Culture & Heritage Center in Lāna‘i City was established in 2007, and is a federally recognized 501c3 non-profit charitable organization. Our programs seek to inspire people to be informed, thoughtful and active stewards of Lāna‘i's legacy landscape by preserving, interpreting and celebrating its natural history, Hawaiian traditions, diverse heritage and cultures, and ranching and plantation era histories.
 
It is seductive to fear the future because we are biologically programmed to look for danger. This natural impulse is enabled by popular media. However, this podcast is meant to awaken a sense of hope for a bright Humalogy™ future. With a more expansive view of the facts, history has proven that humanity constantly progresses. Technology is increasing the speed at which we experience this beneficial progression.
 
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Kronos

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Kronos

Jeremy Robinson

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Two years after his wife's death, oceanographer and former navy SEAL, Atticus Young, attempts to reconcile with his rebellious daughter, Giona, by taking her on the scuba dive of a lifetime-swimming with a pod of peaceful humpback whales in the Gulf of Maine. But the beauty of the sea belies a terror from the deep-a horrific creature as immense as it is ancient. There is no blood, no scream, no fight. Giona is swallowed whole by the massive jaws. Only Atticus remains to suffer the shame of t ...
 
Immerse yourself in Canada’s history! Witness to Yesterday episodes take listeners on a journey to document a time in Canada’s past and explore the people behind it, its significance, and its relevance to today. If you like our work, please consider supporting it: https://bit.ly/support_WTY. To learn more about the Society and Canada’s history, subscribe to our newsletter at https://bit.ly/news_WTY.
 
The Outback Way is Australia's longest shortcut spanning 2700km from Winton in western Queensland to Laverton in Western Australia. The Outback Way Podcast is your travel guide, history book and documentary series about the people, places and purpose of this great Australian roadtrip. There's truly something for everybody on The Outback Way: dinosaurs, art, treasure hunting, heritage and culture, all set against the backdrop of stunning natural landscapes. You'll learn what you need to prepa ...
 
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As we enter the season of seed saving, of easing into dormancy, beginning to consider next season through the lens of the last season, of forward planning, this week Cultivating Place explores some big thinking for our shared future in conversation with Severine Von Tscharner Fleming, one of the women featured in The Earth in Her Hands, 75 Extraord…
 
Early on the morning of October 17, 1781, Lieutenant General Charles, Lord Cornwallis, found himself hunkered down in a cave near the southern shoreline of the York River. Above him was the disintegrating town of Yorktown, Virginia, now being systematically bombarded into rubble by American and French cannon fire. Cornwallis understood that imminen…
 
In this episode, Helen shares the 7 Principals of the Leave No Trace approach to travelling the Outback Way, which is so important to protect our beautiful country for the future. There are many designated camping and caravanning sites along the length of the Outback Way and Helen lists them, as well as the Visitor Information Centre contact detail…
 
An early snowstorm dropped several inches of snow through portions of the Northeast on October 16, 2009. Normally snow during this time of year easily melts on most surfaces with ground and air temperatures usually above the freezing mark. To overcome this, in order for snow to pile up, it has to snow very hard and that is what it did. In Couderspo…
 
Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O’Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O’Neill’s path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant’s philosoph…
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
In this week's show we answer three questions from Louise, Amy and Wilf. The team at Ladybird books explain how Everything Under The Sun - a curious question for every day of the year (the beautiful book of this podcast) was made. Find out how ladybirds get their spots and whether or not its on their birthday? We find out what fingernails on a blac…
 
It has been 67 years since powerful Hurricane Hazel made landfall close to the North Carolina/South Carolina border near Myrtle Beach, S.C., on the morning of Oct. 15, 1954. The storm wreaked havoc across the eastern United States and Canada on its way to the record books. Hazel is considered one of the worst natural disasters in North Carolina's h…
 
Patrice Dutil discusses the life and military career of James Wolfe, the commander of British troops that conquered Quebec in 1759, with Larry Ostola. Ostola is the editor of the 2021 Volume of the Champlain Society entitled Your Most Obedient and Affectionate Son: James Wolfe’s Letters to His Parents, 1740-1759. Dutil and Ostola explore the qualit…
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
Very cold weather had firmly established itself across the Arctic in the late summer and early autumn of 1988. Ice began forming almost 45 days earlier than normal on the regions close to the Alaskan and Siberian coast lines. This impeded coastal travel much earlier than in a normal season. It also disrupted the seasonal migration of wildlife. On O…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
The Black-Headed Duck is the only duck that's a brood parasite: it lays its eggs in the nests of other species. But unlike every other bird in the world that does this, it causes its host species negligible harm - because of what its ducklings do as soon as they hatch ... Subscribe to the show to make sure you don't miss any future Wild Episodes, a…
 
The Battle of Saratoga occurred in September and October, 1777, during the second year of the American Revolution. It included two crucial battles, fought eighteen days apart, and was a decisive victory for the Continental Army and a crucial turning point in the Revolutionary War. After a failed Canadian invasion left much of the Continental Army b…
 
Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of…
 
Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 –1797) was one of the most important moral philosophers and political theorists ever. Her writings on liberty and equality have been embraced by thinkers both in her own day and since her early death. Lionized by feminists and demonized by others as dangerous and a loose woman to boot, Wollstonecraft produced a small but p…
 
If the United States has been so hostile to Marxism, what accounts for Marxism's recurrent attractiveness to certain Americans? Marxism and America: New Appraisals (Manchester University Press, 2021) sheds new light on that question in essays engaging sexuality, gender, race, nationalism, class, memory, and much more, from the Civil War era through…
 
For roughly 16 hours on October 12 2006, the city of Buffalo, NY, was pounded by an unprecedented lake-effect snow event. An unusually cold air mass flowing over the warm waters of Lake Erie set up the small-scale, but severe event. The waters of Lake Erie were a mild 62 degrees, three degrees above normal for October 12. After the snow ended the m…
 
The fashionable and decorous men whom we recognize in portraits and letters from the Italian Renaissance penned some of the most scathing critiques of the courts in which they served. Such anti-courtly discourse furnished a platform for discussing pressing questions of early modern Italian society. The court was the space that witnessed a new form …
 
The phrase, “state of nature”, has been used over centuries to describe the uncultivated state of lands and animals, nudity, innocence, heaven and hell, interstate relations, and the locus of pre- and supra-political rights, such as the right to resistance, to property, to create and leave polities, and the freedom of religion, speech, and opinion,…
 
On October 11, 1737 a furious hurricane hit the mouth of the Ganges river near Calcutta, India. At the same time there was a violent earthquake, which threw down a great many houses along the river just as the hurricane approached, many communities nearby had most of their buildings destroyed by the earthquake and then the hurricane hit. Because of…
 
Winter often comes early to the plans of western Canada. Cold air builds up in the artic regions and plunges southward unhindered through the vast flatlands. Many times this leads to quick changes in temperatures and more importantly the weather. On October 10, 1989 across the Canadian province of Alberta Temperatures dropped from the middle 60’s i…
 
The 1804 Snow hurricane was the first tropical cyclone in recorded history known to produce snowfall. An unusual late-season storm in 1804 it produced vast amounts of snow, rain, and powerful winds across the northeastern United States. Prior to its approach to the East Coast of the US, it passed through the Caribbean on October 4th, and later trac…
 
In this episode we take you on a journey to Whistler Woods in south suburban Riverdale, Illinois, just outside of Chicago. The 137-acre forest preserve along the Little Calumet River is an excellent site to see a wide diversity of bird species and to explore the historic Major Taylor Trail named for Marshall “Major” Taylor, who was an African-Ameri…
 
Race, while drawn from the visual cues of human diversity, is an idea with a measurable past, an identifiable present, and an uncertain future. The concept of race has been at the center of both triumphs and tragedies in American history and has had a profound effect on the human experience. Race Unmasked: Biology and Race in the Twentieth Century …
 
September 1900 brought to Galveston, Texas the worst natural disaster in U S history. A massive hurricane hit the city head on. Destroying most of what was then the 2nd leading port on the Gulf of Mexico, after New Orleans and leaving between 6 and 12,000 dead. Galveston had been the scene of two prior hurricanes, one in 1837 and then again in 1867…
 
On this award winning show, that goes along with the Everything Under The Sun BOOK we answer three questions a week, one with the help of an expert, two are answered by Molly Oldfield, the original QI elf and author of four books! Our first question is why do bad things exist answered by author Laura Dockrill. Next up find out what would happen if …
 
In our second episode focusing on the inspiring beauty of dry gardens and the plants and people who love them, Cultivating Place is joined this week by photo journalist Saxon Holt. The sole photographer on more than 30 garden books, Saxon is also owner of the PhotoBotanic Garden library and director of the Summer-Dry Project.Saxon’s most recent boo…
 
In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Daniel J. Robinson,. He is the author of Cigarette Natio: Business, Health, and Canadian Smokers, 1930–1975 published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2021. Robinson’s account illustrates how smoking became a habit for over half of Canadians, both men and women, by the early postwar period. T…
 
As this book intriguingly explores, for those who would make Rome great again and their victims, ideas of Roman decline and renewal have had a long and violent history. The decline of Rome has been a constant source of discussion for more than 2200 years. Everyone from American journalists in the twenty-first century AD to Roman politicians at the …
 
The Rādhā Tantra is an anonymous 17th-century tantric text from Bengal. Mans Broo's The Rādhā Tantra: A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation (Routledge, 2019) offers a lively picture of the meeting of different religious traditions in 17th century Bengal, since it presents a Śākta version of the famous Vaiṣṇava story of Rādhā and Kṛṣṇa. This …
 
Turning the Mirror: A View From the East is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and award-winning writer Pankaj Mishra. The conversation provides behind-the-scenes insights into several of Pankaj’s books, including From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia and An End To Suffering: The Buddha In The World…
 
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