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Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign. We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.
 
This show will highlight the military engagements of different wars throughout American and World History. We will summarize and analyze the importance of each battle, how they shaped the larger conflict's outcome, and how that conflict shaped, or still shapes, the world as we know it. All of this will be accomplished through a laid back approach over a nice adult beverage. Complete with comedic banter among friends, the goal is to make this particular history fun and enjoyable for scholars ...
 
The Indian subcontinent is about the size of Europe and is way more diverse and complicated - but how much do we know about its violent past? The land of Gandhi is also the land of the war-elephant, of gunpowder-wielding infantry, and of nuclear weapons that destroy everything in their wake. In Yuddha, Anirudh Kanisetti (host of Echoes of India: A History Podcast) and Aditya Ramanathan explore the darker, blood-splattered side of India, beyond Bollywood and school textbooks. From the medieva ...
 
Battles and Beers is a military history podcast that aims to educate the public about the wonders, badassery, and just pure epicness of our planets collective wars and battles. We will try to present each episode in a well researched and humorous manner in a way that is both thought-provoking and easy to understand. Not only will be publish episodes for our podcast, but also vlogs, awesome pictures and videos. Everyone here at B&B has a passion for history, so come join us for a few laughs, ...
 
The early modern era describes the period in Europe and the Americas between 1450 and 1850. The Huntington collections are particularly strong in Renaissance exploration and cartography, English politics and law in the early modern era, the English aristocracy from the later Middle Ages through the 18th century, and 18th-century British and American military history. The USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute supports advanced research and scholarship on human societies of this era, s ...
 
From Napoleonic battles to Cold War confrontations, the Normandy landings to 9/11, this podcast opens up fascinating new perspectives on how wars have shaped and changed our modern world. Each week, twice a week, war historian, writer, and broadcaster, James Rogers, teams up with fellow historians, veterans, and experts to reveal astonishing new histories of inspirational leadership, breakthrough technologies, and era defining battles. Together they highlight the stark realities and conseque ...
 
The Evolution of Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations (EMSO) This podcast will take you on a journey throughout time and around the world to meet the inventors, the battles, and the technology that has not only shaped military operations - how we fight - but also how we live. The History of Crows will cover some of the most important discoveries, battles, and events that shaped what we know today as electromagnetic spectrum operations. Episodes that take you deeper into our history will be ad ...
 
Historic Voices Podcast brings voices from the past that make history come alive through their personal accounts and public speeches. Some episodes bring the voices of political and military leaders, common citizens who lived during extraordinary times, and entertainers who helped Americans live through difficult events. The podcast host provides a short introduction and afterward shares historical context. This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network composed of other family-friendly pod ...
 
Over 900 years ago, thousands of Christians invaded the Middle East, intent on taking the Holy Land from the Muslims. The following 200 years were marked by a series of military campaigns known as the Crusades. Join us to follow the history of the Crusades from 1095 onwards. Castles, battles, religious clashes, Richard the Lionheart, the Assassins, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Saladin, the Knights Templar - all will feature as we examine one of the most interesting periods in history.
 
Official Soundcloud page of the U.S. Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage and the U.S. Army Medical Department Museum. Welcome to the Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage Podcast series, “Army Medicine History”. The opinions and statements of the speakers featured on this podcast are not necessarily the views of the U.S. Army or the U.S. Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage. The goal of this podcast series is to share the story of Army Me ...
 
Noble Sissle, who lived from 1889 to 1975, participated in and witnessed some of America's great moments in history associated with culture and racial equality. Known throughout history as a music lyricist and orchestra leader, Sissle was an ambassador of goodwill for America from World War I with the renowned Harlem Hellfighters' Regimental Band to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s to entertaining millions of military service persons with the USO in World War II to playing for presidents, ...
 
The Australian Naval History Podcast explores naval history in Australia. Each week, historians & veterans discuss a different aspect of Australian naval history. From deep discussions of particular battles, to the histories of submarine classes, the Australian Naval History Podcast is expert analysis & reflection on the storied past of Australia's military at sea. Produced by the Naval Studies Group at UNSW Canberra, in conjunction with the Submarine Institute of Australia, the Australian N ...
 
It’s 1945. Hitler is defeated. America is looking to outsmart a new enemy, the Soviet Union. To advance in rocketry, aviation, and chemical weapons, America recruits scientists and engineers who fueled the war machine of another nation...Nazi Germany. Inspired by the true story behind the Emmy-eligible drama series "Hunters" from Amazon Studios, starring Al Pacino and Logan Lerman, PAPERCLIP explores how Operation Paperclip – the recruitment of Nazi Germany’s most brilliant and, in many case ...
 
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Since 2004 the Malay-Muslim majority provinces in the border region of southern Thailand have been wracked by a violent insurgency. Over 7000 people have been killed and many thousands more injured. Currently 60,000 Thai security personnel are stationed in the region to conduct counter-insurgency operations. Another 80,000 people have been organize…
 
On this episode of Battles & Banter, Avery, Codie and Tony jump back into the Petersburg Campaign of 1864. The guys pick up where they left off with Part 1, when the first Union attempts to take the city by direct assault failed on June 18th. The topic for this episode are the events that took place during the rest of June and July of that bloody y…
 
Pete and Gary explore the Royal Army Medical Corps and their contribution to the Battle of the Somme in 1916. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Pete & Gary's Mil…
 
This is the fifth part of our CoG analysis for the Battle of France series. We discuss the task before Panzergruppe Kleist as it becomes the German Schwerpunkt. Thank you to the British Army's Lessons Exploitation Centre for the assistance with getting the resources for this podcast series. Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the in…
 
August 21, 2013-Dr. Conrad Crane Though the Korean War was a limited conflict, there were many operational and technological temptations to expand it. America's allies feared the United States would again resort to atomic bombs as they did against Japan, and Communist enemies propagated elaborate accusations about the employment of biological warfa…
 
The First Gulf War was the combat debut for the RAF Tornado, and also for many of the aircrew who would fly one. John Nichol served as a navigator in the RAF for 15 years, even returning to service after being shot down in 1991. In this conversation with James, John shares his own experiences of the Tornado and the First Gulf War during which he wa…
 
The story of how the American military—and more particularly the regular army—has played a vital role in the late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century United States that extended beyond the battlefield is the focus of Robert Wooster’s The United States Army and the Making of America: From Confederation to Empire, 1775–1903 (University Press of Kansas…
 
The year is 1942; American citizens are still recovering from the surprise military strike on Pearl Harbor, which had intensely impacted morale across the country and brought them into the Second World War. Fear and division ran deep within the American people, and democracy was under pressure. Joined by Historian and award-winning author of ‘The Y…
 
The story of electromagnetic spectrum operations (EMSO) continues with the birth of radar. With wireless communications paving the way, these technologies led to the early use of electromagnetic warfare from World War I through the US entering World War II, following the attack on Pearl Harbor. In this episode, Mr. Ray Chase from the Information Ag…
 
Every century of recorded history has featured a war. In this episode, Margaret MacMillan joined Dan Snow to discuss the ways in which war has influenced human society. They discussed how, in turn, changes in political organisation, technology, or ideologies have affected how and why we fight. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informati…
 
Pete and Gary bring you the second part of their special series of episodes on Second World War veteran Ray Ellis. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Pete & Gary'…
 
In August 1928, signatories from France, the United States and Germany signed a treaty outlawing war. This so-called Kellogg-Briand Pact was soon signed by almost every state. Yet, in the century since, countless wars have been started ... and not all of them finished. To find out whether the pact has had any impact on international relations since…
 
‘One small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind’: in July 1969 the United States successfully landed on the moon. It was part of a race into space which continues to this week and Jeff Bezos’ short voyage. But how was the American space race aided by Nazi Scientists and their barbaric experiments? Eric Lichtblau has returned to Warfare to tak…
 
Pete and Gary explore the life and military career of Siegfried Sassoon, one of the Great War's most famous poets. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Pete & Gary'…
 
Photography emerged in the 1840s in the United States, and it became a visual medium that documents the harsh realities of enslavement. Similarly, the photography culture grew during the Civil War, and it became an important material that archived this unprecedented war. Deborah Willis's The Black Civil War Soldier: A Visual History of Conflict and…
 
Marching across occupied France in 1944, American GI Leroy Stewart had neither death nor glory on his mind: he was worried about his underwear. "I ran into a new problem when we walked," Stewart wrote, "the shorts and I didn't get along. They would crawl up on me all the time." Crawling underwear may have been a small price to pay for the liberatio…
 
In 1961, UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld's plane was shot down as he flew over the Congo. Dag Hammarskjöld was called ‘the greatest statesman of our century’ by John F. Kennedy, but he was found dead with an Ace of Spades mysteriously placed on his body. In this episode, Dan was joined by award-winning investigative journalist, Ravi Somaiya, …
 
For the first time ever, Avery, Codie & Tony are in the same room for their 70th episode to discuss one of the first major land engagements of the American Civil War. Coming up on the 160th Anniversary of the first battle along the banks of Bull Run near the railroad junction of Manassas, the guys discuss the events that played out between the unte…
 
Besieging a city is often thought to be an antiquated strategy, lost to technological advances and the complexity of modern conflict. In this episode, however, Major Amos C. Fox tells us about modern siege warfare in Ukraine, Iraq and Bosnia, and where the reluctance to label them sieges comes from. Amos is a Major in the U.S. Army and a graduate o…
 
Starting off as a novice photographer with strong political motivations, Gerda Taro became well known during the Spanish Civil War, only to sadly become the first woman photojournalist to have died covering the frontline of a war, aged 26. In this episode, Jane Rogoyska joins James to talk us through Gerda’s background, her partnership with her fel…
 
Political Scientist Nathan Kalmoe has written a fascinating historical and political exploration of the connections between violence and partisanship before, during, and after the American Civil War. This book brings together work by historians and political scientists and straddles both disciplines in the examination of the way that partisan polit…
 
The digital age has touched and changed pretty much everything, even altering how historical research is practiced. In his new book Technology and the Historian: Transformations in the Digital Age (University of Illinois Press, 2021), Adam Crymble makes a meta-historical account of how digital and technological advances have impacted historical res…
 
Pete and Gary continue their exploration of the Battle of the Somme by looking at the terror of the night attack. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Pete & Gary's…
 
A mother of three living in a small British village, and an accomplished Soviet operative who co-ordinated a network of spies within Britain's atomic weapons programme. In this episode, Ben Macintyre joins Dan Snow to discuss one of the greatest spies of the 20th century, the woman alternately known as Mrs Burton, Agent Sonya and, her real name, Ur…
 
Noble Sissle’s son and daughter celebrated what would have been their famous father’s 132nd year after birth in 1889. To mark the date, Sissle’s children, grandchildren and great grandchildren living in 3 locations in California and two in Florida, found a way to celebrate his birthday remotely with poetry and music. The tele-conference party turne…
 
With every new technological breakthrough the battlefield of the future changes, often beyond recognition. Named as one of the United States’ 100 leading innovators by the Smithsonian, one of the 100 most influential people in defense issues by Defense News, and as an official “Mad Scientist” for the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command, Peter…
 
The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled du…
 
81 years after the beginning of the Battle of Britain in July 1940, we are looking at the people behind one of the iconic machines which helped the Allies towards victory. It is known that the average age of a pilot flying a Spitfire in the Battle of Britain was 20 years old, but many of those involved in designing and building the machines were ev…
 
Pete and Gary continue the story of the Royal Norfolk Regiment as they take on the Germans in the Battle of France in 1940. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Pet…
 
This is the fourth part of our CoG analysis for the Battle of France series. We discuss the Center of Gravity for Germany. An interesting case as the Strategic Center of Gravity was unable to defeat France, so the Wehrmacht developed a highly risky operational Center of Gravity to defeat France in just 46 days - something that they could not achiev…
 
In 1902, the British government concluded a defensive alliance with Japan, a state that had surprised much of the world with its sudden rise to prominence. For the next two decades, the Anglo-Japanese alliance would hold the balance of power in East Asia, shielding Japan as it cemented its regional position, and allowing Britain to concentrate on m…
 
When captured Nazi generals found themselves in Britain in the Second World War, they were probably surprised to be brought to a beautiful country house where they were wined and dined by a senior British aristocrat. But it was all a charade. Unbeknown to the generals, every single conversation they had was bugged and an army of translators and tra…
 
In the third installment of Chatter Natter, Pete and Gary speak to Andy Tonge. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Guest: Andy Tonge Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV…
 
Few people have made decisions as momentous as Eisenhower, nor has one person had to make such a varied range of them. From D-Day to Little Rock, from the Korean War to Cold War crises, from the Red Scare to the Missile Gap controversies, Ike was able to give our country eight years of peace and prosperity by relying on a core set of principles. Th…
 
In the shadows of Montgomery, Alexander and Eisenhower, Field Marshal Alan Brooke’s extraordinary contributions as a strategist and leader have been largely forgotten over time. His experiences stretching across the First and Second World War, he held an incredible list of accolades and was one of Churchill’s key advisors leading Britain to victory…
 
In his account of Xerxes' invasion of Greece, the historian Herodotus goes out of his way to give an account of Artemisia, female tyrant of Halicarnassus, before, during and in the aftermath of the battle Salamis in 480 BC. This account, and Artemisia herself, are remarkable for a variety of reasons but the idea of a woman commander, one as clever …
 
158 years ago, the Unionist and Confederate armies were on their second day of fighting at the town of Gettysburg. The battle was arguably the tipping point for the American Civil War and involved an artillery bombardment which may have been the loudest man-made event until the detonation of the first atomic bomb at Alamogordo. But what actually ha…
 
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