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Not Another Science Podcast is the science radio show from the Edinburgh University Science Magazine. Join our hosts Helena Cornu and Tom Edwick as they talk to staff and students about all the fascinating research and projects happening at the university. Intrigued by sourdough? Passionate about climate change? Love to keep it science? Then this is the show for you. Alix Bailie is our podcast manager. Podcast logo by Apple Chew and episode art by Heather Jones. Get in touch at eusci.podcast ...
 
Join us for a series of lectures to celebrate the legacy of David Hume. 2011 marks the tercentenary of the birth of philosopher David Hume, one of our most distinguished alumni. Throughout the year, distinguished speakers will explore the impact of Hume across a wide range of disciplines. David Hume was born in Edinburgh in 1711, attended the University of Edinburgh from 1723, and died in Edinburgh in 1776, having meanwhile achieved worldwide fame as an historian and philosopher. Hume and hi ...
 
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show series
 
This final episode of the season is truly out of this world. The team speaks to Rosa Santomartino, a space microbiologist in the School of Physics and Astronomy. Rosa was one of the lead scientists on the BioRock and BioAsteroid experiments, which sent microbe samples to the International Space Station, to study how the microbes reacted to differen…
 
It’s time to let your creativity juices flow with this bonus episode for international music day. New host Alix speaks to Professor Colin Campbell who wants to bring science out of the lab and into the recording studio. But how do you take some scientific data and turn it into music? There’s no one answer, but Colin takes us through the thinking be…
 
Ever wondered what drones and whales have in common?... In honour of World Oceans Day 2021, guest host Jake talks to PhD student Tom Grove about his inspiring research, investigating the ecological impacts of the Icelandic whale-watching industry. Get ready for some whaley-good chat covering everything from spirituality and icelandic cultural histo…
 
In this bonus to the main episode, we bring you extra sections of our conversation with Daniel Brener, including why he's the black sheep of the family, what PhDs used to be like, the origin of the "butterfly effect", concerns over communicating complexity, and the metaphysics of quiche. Daniel is on Twitter @daniel_brener. To find out more about h…
 
Ramen? Raman! We all love Ramen noodles, but this week is about Raman spectroscopy with PhD student Heather McEwan. It’s time to explore the ups and downs of starting a PhD and how to move from Physics to Chemistry. Heather has used her Physics background to move into an exciting multidisciplinary project which uses the light scattering technique R…
 
A self-described "cloud guy", Daniel Brener has been fascinated by weather forecasting for years. But he is also an all-around physics nerd (a compliment we do not bestow lightly). As part of Prof. Arjun Berera's group at the University of Edinburgh, Daniel has been working out whether panspermia — the idea that particles from Earth could be knocke…
 
This spring, Ben Porter, Lucy Hodson (AKA Lucy Lapwing), Nina Constable and Indy Greene are running a project for people to make their own DIY parabolic reflectors to record birdsong, encouraging people to get out on their doorsteps and connect with the avian chorus in a way they might not have before. Then, on May 2nd — International Dawn Chorus D…
 
This week we close the series with Carlos Magdalena, Senior Horticulturist at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. Carlos is known widely as The Plant Messiah for his innovative successes assisting rare and endangered plants to reproduce and for thereby saving them from extinction. Together we muse on everything to do with The Future of Plants, from the …
 
The place where science and creativity meet: the diverse and wonderful world of Science Communication! Dr Sarah-Jane Judge, Public Engagement Manager at the Wellcome Centre for Cell Research, and Dr Farrie Nzvere, ChatSci Manager for InterSci, talk about the importance of sharing science with different audiences, teaching scientists to communicate,…
 
What will the future of plants look like if currently 2 in 5 are threatened with extinction? That depends on how we act now! Join us as we dive into our last theme of the mini-series, Conserving Plants, with Dr Pete Hollingsworth, Director of Science and Conservation at Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Pete shares with us a diversity of ways plants …
 
Do plants need passports? And why did some members of the UK public receive mysterious seeds through the post that they didn’t order last summer? The plant health inspectors and officers of the UK are tasked with keeping the country’s plant life healthy, which means keeping an eye on, and eradicating if possible, all plant pests and diseases of con…
 
Sourdough is a form of bread baking that leverages a complex community of yeasts and bacteria to give it flavour and rise. Thought to have originated in Ancient Egypt, the practice has since spread to communities all over the world, each with a unique method of creating and maintaining their starter. Behind each starter is a human story: dangerous …
 
What do evolutionary ecology research, the health of plants and public engagement have in common?... Dr Katy Hayden! As a researcher and Plant Health Officer at Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Katy helps safeguard the Garden’s plant collections against pests and diseases. This week, Katy takes us on an audio tour of her working life in the gardens …
 
Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel started her maths career as an actuary, where she spent her days wrangling data and studying after work for her exams. She loved working with data, but doing the exams… not so much. So she embarked on a PhD in statistics, where she discovered a love for teaching and all things pedagogical. Mine’s career since has combined thes…
 
How many mathematicians does it take to optimise your internet shopping deliveries? In conversation with the Winners of the 12th AIMMS-MOPTA Optimization Modeling Competition, we hear how team NP Die Hard discovered their previously untapped skills to solve this problem in 3 months… and get a paper published from their work! From choosing your ware…
 
Could one of the most important anti-cancer compounds really have come from the bark of infamously poisonous yew trees? And as these yews were already threatened, how did we harvest enough bark to produce the drugs we needed without killing them all off? In this second Plants as Our Medicines episode, we dive into the recent history of yews and Tax…
 
Less than 1% of tropical plants have been screened for their potential medicinal uses. Yet many common drugs today are derived from plants. On this episode of Plants & Our Health, we talk with Dr Markus Ruhsam on the impressive potential of plants to the pharmaceutical industry and to help us look after our own health, now and in the future. We als…
 
Did you know some plants grow crystals to scatter light? And some bacteria can sense the Earth's magnetic fields? This week, we chat to Dr. Fabio Nudelman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Chemistry, who tells us about how living organisms incorporate minerals into their biological structures, the wonderful uses they have for such materi…
 
Close relatives of wheat, tomato and all other major crops still grow in the wild. However, human impacts are increasingly placing these species under threat. This week on Plants & Our Health we talk with Dr Nigel Maxted, Professor of Plant Genetic Conservation at the University of Birmingham, about turning research into policy and action, the impo…
 
Where would we be without the plants that feed us? Why should we grow our own, and grow them together? This week on Plants & Our Health, we dive into the delicious new theme of ‘Plants on our Plates’ with Elinor Leslie, Community Gardener at Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Elinor works on the Edible Gardening Project, assisting diverse groups with …
 
Who do you go to when you have problems with crabs? Meadows Share obviously! This was only one of the fascinating questions that arose when we spoke to the team from Robocean in our second episode of season 2. The team recently won the Edinburgh Innovations Students Business Ideas Competition with their plan to restore the UK’s seagrass — a vital n…
 
How could a doctor prescribe you nature? Does it work? And who is it for? On this second episode of our new miniseries Plants & Our Health, we continue to explore the theme ‘Plants & Our Mental Health’ with Nature Prescriptions Project Development Executive Elaine Bradley, and Edinburgh GP Dr Louise Bailey. Our two guests share their experiences wo…
 
What do you think of when you hear ‘botanic gardens’? In the very first episode of Plants & Our Health, a new miniseries exploring how plants support human health and wellbeing, we discuss with Simon Milne MBE how botanic gardens are much more than collections of plants. Simon is Regius Keeper at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE), an instit…
 
Is a coral a really smart rock or a very stupid plant? In the first episode of season 2, we dive into the biology of corals with Nadia Jogee, a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh’s School of Geosciences. More specifically, Nadia studies coralliths, a type of mobile coral, and the role they might play in reef recovery and expansion — a parti…
 
For the final episode of the season, we have another joint interview! Prof. Miguel Anjos and Dr. Lars Schewe both work in the field of mathematical optimisation, looking at different aspects of energy networks. They dive into how optimisation can be used to solve problems at any scale, from sorting out your local bus route to managing the decarboni…
 
This week’s guest is Sorrel Lyall, a third-year ecology student at the University of Edinburgh, a stupendously talented birder and artist, and president of the Edinburgh University Ornithological Society (also known as BirdSoc). We talk birdwatching, running a society during a pandemic, and about how we can promote diversity in birding. Sorrel can …
 
Dr Ed Hutchison almost dropped his cup of tea when he found out that the research he had been working on since his postdoc, on which he had founded his lab, had been scooped. What followed is a heartwarming story of collaboration, teamwork, generosity, and kindness in science. Today we bring you our conversation with Dr Hutchinson, and with one of …
 
“There’s a terrible myth that scientists are supposed to be all-knowing. And no, we’re blunderers around in the dark. The whole of science is about that: if we knew what we were doing it wouldn’t be research.” Jamie Davies has had a fascinating career in academia, and along the way he’s learned some important lessons. In this episode, he passes on …
 
At school, Jamie Davies was fascinated by how impossibly complex things can arise from very simple beginnings. He decided that he would become a radio astronomer and investigate the formation of galaxies from the stars and planets of our universe. But then he went to university. During his degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge, he came across the…
 
Wikipedia is an online, open-source encyclopaedia that attracts 1.5 billion unique visitors every month, and has 54 million articles written in more than 300 different languages. Not just a place to learn interesting facts (or cheat in a pub quiz), Wikipedia is an incredibly important resource used by journalists, teachers, media teams, companies, …
 
Welcome to the first episode of our new season! Before we kick off the season properly, we thought we’d introduce ourselves. We’d also love to meet you all, so be sure to attend the events we’re organising for Welcome Week — more details in the episode, and on our social media. Not Another Science Podcast is edited by Helena Cornu, hosted by Tom Ed…
 
The SARS-Cov-2 (Covid-19) pandemic swept around the world in a frighteningly short amount of time. With each news update, the number of affected regions, the number of cases, and the number of deaths climbed. In such a frantic situation, where the virus was seemingly everywhere, how do you determine how the disease spread through populations and ac…
 
Drug development is a slow process at the best of times. So the best way to rapidly find treatments for Covid-19 was to find known drugs that could be repurposed to fight the new disease. But with the confusion created by the myriad of studies published about Covid-19, often without peer-review, how do you keep track of everything? This is where Ja…
 
When a pandemic disrupts your 3D printing operations, what do you do? Well, if you’re the team at Augment Bionics, you shift gears and start mass producing Personal Protective Equipment. Augment Bionics is a student start up from the University of Edinburgh, and in normal times their engineers design and print prosthetic limbs. Financed by a GoFund…
 
Why do some people get more sick than others? The answer could lie in our genes. In this episode we talk to Max Fourman, who is part of the Baillie Lab run by Dr Kenneth Baillie, and based at the Roslin Institute at The University of Edinburgh. They use genomics - the sequencing, study, and mapping of the genome - to search for the genes that make …
 
Christmas Eve! We have survived 24 days of 24 podcasts. Now all that remains is to survive the Christmas holidays. This final show of 2018 also doubles up as my best of the year. My 10 favourite tracks played (or maybe not played) on the show throughout 2018. Thanks for listening and thanks for making it to the end. Hope you all have a great Christ…
 
We delve back into the archives for today’s show. Exactly 8 years ago on the 23rd of December 2010 it was the first part of the very first Edinburgh Man best of the year show. Unfortunately I didn’t really keep very good records back then, so I’ve had to actually download and listen to (bits of) the show to extract 3 tracks to play. Yikes! I mean, …
 
Someone once told me that in the run up to Christmas kids get crazy. Oh boy. Today is only the first day in the Christmas holidays and they’ve been absolutely bonkers. I’m not sure that I can cope with another two weeks of this! 1. Richard Andrews – “The Golden Fascination” (Played courtesy of Richard Andrews, Released under a Creative Commons lice…
 
I record this podcast with the dulcet tones of Thing 2 who is not even attempting to go to sleep and instead is making up words to “The Wheels on the Bus”. I suppose it makes a change from Jingle Bells. Thankfully. Music-wise, it’s all tracks from Milanese artists or record labels. During the October holidays we went to Milan for a few days. In cel…
 
Christmas really is coming now. Only a handful of days left to go, but somehow there is still more great music from 2018 yet to play. On tonight’s show, two tracks from two great albums released this month by podcast favourites The Planes and Townhouse Woods. A track from earlier this year by Melbourne’s Hearts and Rockets, and a wonderful track fr…
 
It’s the 19th Advent Calendar show. Oh my, that means we are in the twenties tomorrow. The home straight. Unfortunately I’m recording today’s show on my MacBook with the built-in microphone. As a result the sound quality may be a bit gammy. Apologies for this. Hopefully the music will make up for it. As well as lots of new tracks we also look back …
 
In which I delve into the cupboard in the hall, pull out a dusty bottle of nine and a half year old homebrew white port and sample it “live”. 1. ballboy – “Merry Christmas to the Drunks, Merry Christmas to the Lovers” (Played courtesy of Ballboy) 2. Cloudkicker – “Not to Scale or Painted” (Played courtesy of Cloudkicker, Released under a Creative C…
 
I’m feeling pretty sorry for myself today. Not enough food or too much coffee. Either way I’ve got a blazing headache, but I still manage to stumble through the Edinburgh Man archives to play some tracks from “on this day in history”. Specifically, on this day in 2015. Some tracks played on, or related to those tracks played on podcast number 220. …
 
Warning. I have consumed beer. And wine. Just two glasses of each. But to be honest that’s probably double my limit nowadays. Getting old, eh? 1. Molly Lewis – “Pantsuit Sasquatch” (Played courtesy of Molly Lewis, Released under a Creative Commons licence) 2. Speedy Ortiz – “DTMFA” (Played courtesy of Speedy Ortiz, Released under a Creative Commons…
 
It’s the 15th Advent Calendar Podcast! We’re well into the second half now. My goodness, we might actually pull this off. Right, I decided to delve into the Edinburgh Man archives for much of this episode. Specifically I looked back to find any other shows that occurred on the 15th of December. And I found one. Number 80 from back in 2011. When I w…
 
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