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Cinephile: Passionate interest in film, film theory, and film criticism. It's a term that fits Adnan Virk perfectly. Join each week as he reviews the newest films, latest television, and chats with heavy hitters in the entertainment industry about their recent projects and successful careers. From engaging conversations to entertaining topics, Cinephile also offers historical perspective, recapping some of the most influential tv shows and films of our lifetime.
 
Brooks Adams (1848- 1927), was an American historian and a critic of capitalism. He believed that commercial civilizations rise and fall in predictable cycles. First, masses of people draw together in large population centers and engage in commercial activities. As their desire for wealth grows, they discard spiritual and creative values. Their greed leads to distrust and dishonesty, and eventually the society crumbles. In The Law of Civilisation and Decay (1895), Adams noted that as new pop ...
 
In this podcast Dr Neema Parvini, Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Surrey, and author of several books, interviews various Shakespeare scholars and literary theorists from around the world in a bid to gain an understanding of the current state of play in Shakespeare studies and in literary criticism more generally. Through a series of candid talks, it will tackle the biggest theoretical and practical questions that have preoccupied scholars and readers of Shakespeare alike for ...
 
Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. Each episode of Ipse Dixit features a different guest discussing their scholarship. The podcast also features several special series. "From the Archives" consists historical recordings potentially of interest to legal scholars and lawyers. "The Homicide Squad" consists of investigations of the true stories behind different murder ballads, as well as examples of how different musicians have interpreted the song over time. "The Day Antitrust Died?" ...
 
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I spoke with Prof. Tim Jackson about his latest book: Post Growth, Life after Capitalism, published by Polity Books in 2021. The book starts with a reflection on the event of the past few months. The success in 2019 of the school strikes for climate, the attention that Greta Thunberg received even in Davos, and the arrival of the pandemic that chan…
 
Fiction writer and cultural critic Alex Perez joins Outsider Theory to discuss a mutual favorite writer, Roberto Bolaño, and in particular his short story "Labyrinth." We also cover the contemporary literary prestige economy, the professionalization of literature, the propagandification of culture in the Trump era, and the prospects for literary ou…
 
How should we understand creative work? In Creative Control: The Ambivalence of Work in the Culture Industries (Columbia UP, 2021), Michael Siciliano, an assistant professor of sociology at Queen's University, Canada, explores this question through a comparison of a recording studio and a digital content creation company. The book considers the mea…
 
What is the impact of surveillance capitalism on our right to free speech? The Internet once promised to be a place of extraordinary freedom beyond the control of money or politics, but today corporations and platforms exercise more control over our ability to access information and share knowledge to a greater extent than any state. From the onlin…
 
The 19th century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche stands among the canon’s most-cited figures, with aphorisms dotting texts on a variety of topics, and his name evokes strong responses from almost anyone who has ever heard of him. His aphoristic and poetic writing style have made it difficult at times to understand what he meant, although the…
 
Documentary filmmaker Alex Lee Moyer joins Outsider Theory to discuss her 2020 film TFW No GF and its reception during the year after its release, as well as the film she edited prior to that, The New Radical. We also discuss the broader project of documenting countercultures, the ambivalent role of technology in channeling and enabling the control…
 
Working Aesthetics: Labour, Art and Capitalism (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019) is the story of art and work under contemporary capitalism. Whilst labour used to be regarded as an unattractive subject for art, the proximity of work to everyday life has subsequently narrowed the gap between work and art. The artist is no longer considered apart from the …
 
Itay Snir's book Education and Thinking in Continental Philosophy (Springer, 2020) draws on five philosophers from the continental tradition – Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, and Jacques Rancière – in order to “think about thinking” and offer new and surprising answers to the question: How can we educate students to …
 
How do race and sexuality intersect in the American sitcom? In The Generic Closet: Black Gayness and the Black-Cast Sitcom (Indiana University Press, 2021), Alfred L Martin, an assistant professor of communication studies at The University of Iowa, explores the production and reception of Black-cast sitcoms, along with a detailed analysis of the re…
 
Prathama Banerjee's book Elementary Aspects of the Political: Histories from the Global South (Duke UP, 2020) studies the rise of modern politics in India, between the mid-19th and the mid-20thcenturies, at the cusp of colonial modern, classical Indian, Indo-Persian and regional vernacular ideas. It unpacks the political, following modern common se…
 
In this episode, Brian N. Larson, Associate Professor of Law at Texas A&M University School of Law, discusses his article "Endogenous and Dangerous," which will be published in the Nevada Law Journal. Larson begins by observing that judicial opinions often include endogenous citations, or citations that don't appear in the briefing of either party.…
 
In this episode, David P. Weber, Professor of Law at Creighton University School of Law, discusses his article "Athletes in Transit: Why the Game is Different in Sports and the Visas Should be Too," which will be published in the Tulane Law Review. Weber begins by noting the scholarly consensus that immigration is generally a net positive to the na…
 
The writer Michael Sacasas joins Outsider Theory to discuss what the tech critics pre-Internet generations – especially Jacques Ellul, Marshall McLuhan, Ivan Illich, and Neil Postman – have to say to us today as well as what contemporary tech criticism tends to miss, and how he understands his own critical and philosophical project. We also explore…
 
In Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future: Kanaka Maoli and Critical Settler Cartographies in Hawai'i (Duke University Press, 2021), Candace Fujikane draws upon Hawaiian stories about the land and water and their impact upon Native Hawai'ian struggles to argue that Native economies of abundance provide a foundation for collective work against cli…
 
Is curiosity political? Does it have a philosophical lineage? In Curiosity and Power: The Politics of Inquiry (University of Minnesota Press, 2021), Perry Zurn shows, consequentially, yes. He further asks: Who can be curious? How? When? To what effect? What happens when we are curious together? Engaged with multiple social movements ranging from th…
 
In this episode, I interview Kas Saghafi, associate professor of philosophy at the University of Memphis, about his book The World After the End of the World, published through SUNY Press in 2020. In this book, Kas Saghafi argues that the notion of “the end the world” in Derrida’s late work is not a theological or cosmological matter, but a meditat…
 
In this episode, Noah Chauvin, a recent graduate of William & Mary Law School and a current judicial clerk, discusses his scholarship on free speech, including his article "Governments 'Erasing History' and the Importance of Free Speech," which will be published in the Northern Illinois University Law Review, and his book review, "Anthony Leaker's …
 
In this episode, Jamie Abrams, Professor of Law at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, discusses her articles "Legal Education's Curricular Tipping Point," which will be published in the Hofstra Law Review, and "Feminist Pedagogy in Legal Education," which will be published in the Oxford Handbook of Feminism and Law in the United S…
 
What is the story of race in American fiction? In Redlining Culture: A Data History of Racial Inequality and Postwar Fiction (Columbia University Press, 2020), Richard Jean So, an assistant professor of English in the Department of English at McGill University, uses computational and quantitative methods, alongside close textual analysis, to demons…
 
In this episode, I interview Michael Snediker, professor of English at the University of Houston, about his book, Contingent Figure: Chronic Pain and Queer Embodiment, recently published by University of Minnesota Press. At the intersection of queer theory and disability studies, Snediker locates something unexpected: chronic pain. Starting from th…
 
In this episode, I interview David Wills, professor of French Studies at Brown University, about his book, Prosthesis, recently republished for its 25th anniversary by University of Minnesota Press. A landmark work in posthuman thought that analyzes and explores the human body as a technology, the book promotes the idea that the human body is open …
 
Political Theorist and activist Dana Mill’s latest new book, Rosa Luxemburg (Reaktion Books, 2020), is part of an extensive series of books published by Reaktion Books, Ltd, which focuses both on the ideas or creations and the lives of many leading cultural figures of the modern period. These volumes are not long, but they are thorough, and they he…
 
Ken Burns’ latest PBS documentary profiles one of America’s greatest writers – Ernest Hemingway. On this episode, Adnan reviews all six hours of the documentary and give his thoughts on the writings and influence of the famous author. The BAFTA Awards took place over the weekend and Adnan recaps the biggest surprises and snubs from the ceremony. Ad…
 
Bearing with Strangers: Arendt, Education and the Politics of Inclusion (Routledge, 2018) looks at inclusion in education in a new way. By introducing the notion of the instrumental fallacy, it shows how this is not only an inherent feature of inclusive education policies, but also omnipresent in modern educational policy. It engages with schooling…
 
Frank Ruda's book Abolishing Freedom. A Plea for a Contemporary Use of Fatalism (University of Nebraska Press 2016) presents a compelling reading of authors diverse as Martin Luther, Descartes, Kant, Hegel, and Freud. They grapple with the limits of human freedom, and obviously so. Because we understand freedom - at least since Aristotle - as a cap…
 
In this episode, Seth G. Benzell, Assistant Professor at Chapman University Argyros School of Business and Economics, discusses his work on how to understand and regulate Facebook, which he co-authored with Avinash Collis. You can read their article, "How to Govern Facebook: A Structural Model for Taxing and Regulating Big Tech," or their white pap…
 
Emile Bojesen's book Forms of Education: Rethinking Educational Experience Against and Outside the Humanist Legacy (Routledge, 2019) analyses the tenets of the humanist legacy in terms of its educational ethos, examining its contradictions and its limits, as well as the extent of its capture of educational thought. It develops a broader conception …
 
In this episode, Kurt Schneider, former CEO of the Harlem Globetrotters, entrepreneur, and host of the Smart Drivel podcast, discusses the entertainment industry, his experiences working with lawyers, and his love of martinis. Schneider begins by explaining his background in the entertainment industry at Disney, WWE, and the Harlem Globetrotters, a…
 
Justin Murphy joins Outsider Theory to discuss leaving academia, his book Based Deleuze, why political correctness is only ones symptom of the real ailments afflicting the contemporary university, what conservatives get wrong about critical theory, and the current prospects of independent intellectual life, especially on the internet. Justin's proj…
 
The new action film "Nobody" stars Bob Odenkirk as a mild-mannered family man whose resentment and suppressed fighting skills are awakened after thieves break into his home. This week, Adnan reviews film along with the 2012, Paul Thomas Anderson movie, "The Master." Adnan also recaps the SAG Awards and speaks with director Alexander Nanau, whose gr…
 
During the middle decades of the twentieth century, the production of America’s consumer culture was centralized in New York to an extent unparalleled in the history of the United States. Every day tens of thousands of writers, editors, artists, performers, technicians, and secretaries made advertisements, produced media content, and designed the s…
 
The last several decades have seen tremendous political and cultural strides forward for the LGBTQ+ community with both the legislative and cultural recognition helping many secure a more safe and open lifestyle than possible just a short while ago. However, these advances have raised a number of criticisms and qualifications, and not just from stu…
 
In this episode, Amy Cyphert, Lecturer in Law and Director of the ASPIRE Office at the West Virginia University College of Law, discusses her article "Reprogramming Recidivism: The First Step Act and Algorithmic Prediction of Risk," which is published in the Seton Hall Law Review. Cyphert begins by explaining how the First Step Act changed the way …
 
In Poor Queer Studies: Confronting Elitism in the University (Duke UP, 2020), Matt Brim shifts queer studies away from its familiar sites of elite education toward poor and working-class people, places, and pedagogies. Brim shows how queer studies also takes place beyond the halls of flagship institutions: in night school; after a three-hour commut…
 
What role did culture play in the British Empire? In Imperial Encore: The Cultural Project of the Late British Empire Caroline Ritter, an Assistant Professor of History at Texas State University, explores the importance of culture in maintaining Imperial domination, and then in supporting post-Imperial British influence. Using core case studies of …
 
Historian and writer Blake Smith joins Outsider Theory to discuss the teaching theory and the formation of elites; the surprising affinities between Strauss and Foucault; the parallel grooming practices of Straussians and Derrideans; the perverse economy of enjoyment in the Trump era; Obama’s failed use of theory as seduction prop; and why Foucault…
 
In Central Europe, limited success in revisiting the role of science in the segregation of Roma reverberates with the yet-unmet call for contextualizing the impact of ideas on everyday racism. This book attempts to interpret such a gap as a case of epistemic injustice. It underscores the historical role of ideas in race-making and provides analytic…
 
Robert Beshara’s Freud and Said: Contrapuntal Psychoanalysis as Liberation Praxis (Palgrave, 2021) is a guide through the textual relationship between the work of Sigmund Freud and Edward Said. It is also a valuable handbook in critical psychology that chronicles many works at the intersection of psychoanalysis and decoloniality from around the wor…
 
The new film "The Last Blockbuster" follows the last remaining Blockbuster Video Store, located in Bend, Oregon, and it's manager who is struggling to keep it's doors open. This week Adnan reviews the Netflix documentary along with the 2006 film "Hollywoodland" and the 2012 film "Silver Linings Playbook." He also interviews director Azazel Jacobs, …
 
In this episode, Cathay Y. N. Smith, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Montana Blewett School of Law, discusses her new article "Weaponizing Copyright." Smith begins by explaining that "weaponizing" copyright is using it for non-copyright ends. In theory, copyright is supposed to be about ensuring that copyright owners reap the econom…
 
Feminist Geography Unbound: Discomfort, Bodies, and Prefigured Futures, edited by Banu Gökarıksel, Michael Hawkins, Christopher Neubert, and Sara Smith (West Virginia University Press, 2021) is a collection of papers by a diverse range of up-and-coming scholars in feminist geography. Addressing topics from Dalit activism to tiny houses to restrict…
 
In this episode, Evan Bernick, Executive Director of the Georgetown Center for the Constitution and Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown, discusses his article "Constitutional Hedging." Bernick begins by explaining that "constitutional hedging" is when judges consider the merits and demerits of multiple theories of constitutional interpretation …
 
How does a specific American religious identity acquire racial meaning? What happens when we move beyond phenotypes and include clothing, names, and behaviors to the characteristics that inform ethnoracial categorization? Forever Suspect, Racialized Surveillance of Muslim Americans in the War on Terror (Rutgers University Press, 2018) provides a nu…
 
In this episode, J. Remy Green, a partner at Cohen & Green PLLC and a teacher at Boston University Law and Baruch College at the City University of New York, and Austin A. Baker, a postdoctoral assistant professor at the Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science, discuss their article "There is No Such Thing as a Legal Name: A Strange, Shared Delusion."…
 
In this episode, Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law, discusses the history of his professional career and the relationship between his art practice and his legal scholarship. Among other things he reflects on how he became interested in the law and how he became a copyright scholar. He explai…
 
In this episode, Michael Dunford, a PhD student at Queen Mary University of London, discusses his copyright scholarship and his role as a copyright educator on Twitter. Dunford begins by explaining his path to studying copyright law. He describes the thesis of his dissertation, which reflects on why it's so hard to solve the policy problem posed by…
 
Jesse Walker, author of the excellent United States of Paranoia (2013) and books editor at Reason, joins Outsider Theory to revisit his book's arguments in light of Trump era politics. We discuss the Capitol riot and why it reveals not a unified front but a highly fractured right-wing fringe, and the continuities between liberal establishment paran…
 
Robbie Shilliam’s new book for the Polity Press’s “Decolonizing the Curriculum” series explores how the discipline of political science was born of colonialism, and takes us through different ways of reimagining our study of politics. In this conversation, Robbie talks to host Yi Ning Chang not just about reconceptualizing the various subfields, bu…
 
Red Creative: Culture and Modernity in China (Intellect Books, 2020) is an exploration of China’s cultural economy over the last twenty years, particularly through the lens of its creative hub of Shanghai. The research presented here raises questions about the nature of contemporary ‘creative’ capitalism and the universal claims of Western modernit…
 
Thomas Vinterberg's film "Another Round" earned him a 2021 Oscar nomination for Best Director. The film follows four high school teachers who consume alcohol on a daily basis to see how it affects their social and professional lives. On this week's episode, Adnan review the acclaimed film along with Disney's "Raya and the Last Dragon" and Netflix's…
 
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