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WFUV's award-winning, weekly public affairs program. Host George Bodarky covers New York City issues from the humorous to the sobering; whether it's an examination of local hipsters, homelessness or historic architecture. "Cityscape gives me 30 minutes to focus on a particular issue, to really delve into it," says Bodarky. "I love to walk," he says. "I will just walk around Manhattan and discover new neighborhoods, new communities, and to me that's the best thing... Much of what I bring to t ...
 
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According to the U.S. government, overdose deaths soared to a record 93-thousand last year in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Floyd Mitchell is a harm reduction coordinator at The Alliance for Positive Change in New York City. Given the surge in opioid use – and overdoses nationally – his work has become even more vital. Floyd is a part of the …
 
It’s not everyday we think about the role smell plays in our lives. But, its scents like sunscreen that transport us to a day at the beach, or pine that reminds us of summer camp. Scents hold many of our best memories, and perhaps no one knows this better than Sue Phillips. She’s the founder of Scenterprises. Sue has created fragrances for the star…
 
Our guest this week is in the business of helping at-risk kids get on more stable ground. Gabriele Delmonaco is President and Executive Director of A Chance In Life. The international nonprofit provides shelter, food and education to nearly 4,000 homeless, vulnerable and refugee youth in nine countries. They recently opened a facility in the North …
 
Theatre has long helped to break barriers and build community. Queens Theatre is a great example of that. It’s been training Deaf and disabled theatre professionals for years. Their services have become that much more important as people with disabilities grapple with significant job losses due to the pandemic.As cultural institutions continue to r…
 
After a year of isolation, a lot of us want nothing more than to get out there and interact with other people. New York City’s public markets are one way to ease your way back into socialization. The company Urbanspace is the brains behind some very nifty food halls and seasonal markets in locations such as Times Square, Bryant Park, Union Square a…
 
Bars and nightclubs took a big hit during the pandemic. Many were forced to close their doors for good. But, the shuttering of Lesbian bars, in particular, is something that has been an ongoing trend, even before COVID-19 gripped the nation. There are now just over 20 Lesbian bars in America. Three of them are in New York City. Enter filmmakers Eri…
 
At a time when many businesses were shutting their doors, LeAnn Darland and Tara Hankinson were opening their flagship brewery and taproom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. LeAnn and Tara were both avid homebrewers. They met after leaving their corporate jobs in tech and media to join the beer industry. They opened TALEA in March of 2021. LeAnn and Tara a…
 
Musician Tracy Bonham rose to fame in 1996 with her hit single Mother Mother. Bonham says a lot of her early music was driven by anger, but her sound today is fueled by joy. Over the past several years, Bonham has been busy teaching music to kids at the Brooklyn Preschool of Science. She is also now a mom and has recently released a new children’s …
 
She’s known as the Sausage Queen. Cara Nicoletti is a 4th generation butcher. She and her company Seemore Meats and Veggies have been breaking new ground in the meat industry. Cara, who lives in Brooklyn, is one of the few women who own and operate a butcher business in the United States, and her company is all about making eating meat less of a bu…
 
As New Yorkers prepare to elect a new mayor for the first time in 8 years, a new book provides a deep dive into how the city evolved under four previous administrations -- Koch, Dinkins, Giuliani and Bloomberg. It’s called New York, New York, New York: Four Decades of Success, Excess and Transformation. Author Thomas Dyja says over the last few dec…
 
"C is for Cookie" and that’s good enough, well, for a lot of us. On this week’s Cityscape we’re checking in with Zachary Schmahl, a self-described born cookie monster. Zachary is the owner of Schmackary's in Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood. You’ll often see a line of folks outside the shop waiting for their chance to bite into one of Zachar…
 
Whoever said you can’t go home, hasn’t met Marty Kleinman. The Bronx-born storyteller returned to his home borough after spending several decades in Queens, Manhattan and Brooklyn. Kleinman is out with a new collection of short stories called A Shoebox Full of Money, inspired by his life in and away from the Bronx. He joins us on this week's Citysc…
 
On this week's Cityscape we’re checking in with one early childhood education program in Brooklyn that uses classic songs and original ones to create a unique music-centric learning experience for young ones. Alex Branson, creator and host of Lavender Blues, joins us to talk about her journey from being a nanny to becoming the "baby singer," and th…
 
Libraries have long been a great escape for a lot of people – the perfect place to slip away from the hustle and bustle of life. But, when the pandemic forced libraries to shut their doors, library leaders had to move swiftly to make sure they could still serve their communities. Our guest this week is Dennis Walcott, President and CEO of the Queen…
 
As theaters crawl to a comeback in the pandemic, a former Rockette is among those kicking their way back onto a live stage. Lillian Colon was Radio City Music Hall’s first Latina Rockette. But, the road to Radio City wasn’t an easy one for Colon. She's now telling her story in a one-woman show at the Thalia Theater in Queens. But, before the curtai…
 
Many artists have been struggling throughout the pandemic. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re exploring the history of a program that helped artists through another challenging time in our history -- the 1970s economic crisis.Our guests say the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) could serve as a model to help artists rebound from this ti…
 
The pandemic has had a profound effect on many industries and organizations, including nonprofits. Joining us this week to talk about the ripple effects of a pandemic on nonprofits, and the work her organization is doing to help them rebound is Danielle Holly. She’s the CEO of Common Impact. The organization helps nonprofits grow to achieve greater…
 
Over the past year a lot of people have found sanity in new hobbies like puzzles, coloring, knitting and crocheting.On this week’s Cityscape, we’re talking with Felicia Eve. She’s the owner of String Thing Studio, a yarn shop and haven for all kinds of crafters, located in Brooklyn. She joins us to talk about her journey to a career in crafting, po…
 
It's "game back on" for an indie arcade gallery and bar in Brooklyn. Wonderville is now open again after shutting down amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. On this week's Cityscape, we’ll plug into the history of Wonderville with the creative couple who brought the concept to life. Also, T-shirt weather will be here before you know it. One New York City s…
 
Born and raised in Greenwich Village, and still living there today, Donna Florio has amassed a collection of tales about her life on Bank Street. Over the years she's encountered a large cast of characters, from Sid Vicious of Sex Pistols fame, to John Lennon and Yoko Ono, to activist and politiician Bella Abzug. But, her new memoir Growing Up Bank…
 
Breathing is something a lot of us take for granted, but our guest on this week’s Cityscape says the way in which we breathe, could improve our physical health and state of mind, and not just during a crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Richard Brown is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians an…
 
In America they’re called row houses, but across the pond in England, a row of wall-sharing homes is called a terraced house. Regardless of what you call them, it’s part of what separates cities like London, New York, Boston and Amsterdam from places like Paris and Minneapolis. In his new book, The North Atlantic Cities, author, planner and histori…
 
Jigsaw puzzles are an age-old pastime, and with more people staying home during the COVID-19 pandemic, they’re seeing a resurgence in popularity. British mapmaker and engraver John Spilsbury is credited with making the first jigsaw puzzle in 1762. He was a cartographer, and created what he called "dissected maps" to teach kids geography. On this we…
 
Our guest this week is a social justice musician who uses hip-hop and visual storytelling to educate upcoming generations. He goes by the name of Fyütch. Fyütch is from Gary, Indiana, but he now calls New York City home. He joins us to talk about what brought him to the Big Apple, how he arrived at his stage name, and the message behind his music.…
 
"COVID Hair, Don’t Care." That might be true for a lot of people, but barbershops are still open for folks who want to have a fresh clean look for that next Zoom meeting. On this week’s show, we’re checking in with one New York City barbershop that offers a history lesson with a trim. The NYC Barbershop Museum is a place for classic cuts and barber…
 
In times like these, the gentle flickering of a candle can help you feel at ease. And if that candle also has a delightful fragrance, your spirits could be lifted to a whole ‘nother level. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with a Bronx native who's fanning the flames of a successful candle making business. And taking wax to a different extrem…
 
You can’t have a conversation about historical architecture without referencing Stanford White. He was one of the most prominent architects of the Gilded Age. White was a partner in the firm McKim, Mead and White, which built some of the most iconic institutional and domestic buildings of the early 20th century. White’s great-grandson Samuel G. Whi…
 
The music industry still has a long way to go for gender equality. Research shows that women remain woefully underrepresented in the industry. Enter All the Ladies, a new children's album that was created in protest of the lack of female representation in the music industry. The collection of 11 songs is focused on general equality, female empowerm…
 
Now that we’re heading into the thick of the winter season, who couldn’t use a warm cup of tea? What about a cup while seated on antique furniture? Our guest this week can offer you both. Honey Moon is the owner of both Brooklyn High Low, a new tea spot located in Prospect Heights, and 1 of a Find, a vintage shop that’s just down the street from th…
 
After sitting on a jury in a trial involving a double homicide in East Harlem, Efrem Sigel wanted answers. He wanted to know more about the circumstances that led the young people involved to engage in a life of crime and violence. The killings took place in the courtyard of the East River Houses, a public housing complex located on 1st Avenue betw…
 
What do George Carlin, Barack Obama, Humphrey Bogart and Billie Holiday all have in common? They all once resided on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. A new book highlights nearly 600 hundred notables who at one time or another lived on the Upper West Side. It’s called Notable New Yorkers of Mahattan’s Upper West Side: Bloomingdale and Morningside …
 
A lot of names come to mind when we think of people who have shaped New York City history -- John D. Rockefeller, Edith Wharton, and Robert Moses, for instance. But there are many names you might not know. And too many of those names belong to people of color. Do you know the name of the person who helped desegregate New York City public transporta…
 
The United States has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the developed world, and black women are several times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. Bruce McIntyre is trying to do something about that. His partner died after an emergency C-section at a Bronx hospital in late April. He says her death is an example of long-s…
 
With COVID-19 cases on the rise, what are the challenges older New Yorkers are facing as the pandemic rages on? According to a new AARP Foundation and United Health Foundation report, the pandemic has resulted in an “epidemic of loneliness” among older adults. Joining us this week to talk more about this and other issues related to the impact of th…
 
The bookstore scene isn’t what it used to be, but New York City is still home to some remarkable booksellers, including Argosy Books, the city’s oldest independent bookstore and the Strand, arguably the most recognizable bookshop in the city. In this episode, we’re diving into the story of Café Con Libros, an intersectional Feminist community books…
 
New York City has long come to life during the holiday season. Between the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree and the elaborately decorated holiday windows at stores like Macy’s and Saks Fifth Avenue, it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas in the Big Apple, even in the midst of a pandemic. But, until the late 19th century it wasn’t Christmas, b…
 
With the COVID-19 pandemic having brought the curtain down on performances across New York City, The Center for Traditional Music and Dance is launching an online series to provide a stage for immigrant artists, especially vulnerable members of the creative community. More than 50 leading traditional instrumentalists, dancers, singers, poets and mo…
 
2020 has been anything but an easy year -- you know with a pandemic and all. But, a little humor can go a long way. Enter award-winning writer, illustrator, and cartoonist, Bob Eckstein. Bob has had his cartoons published in the New York Times, MAD magazine and the New Yorker. Bob's a regular guest on Cityscape, and joins us this week to talk about…
 
"Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses." It’s a quip attributed to writer, poet and critic Dorothy Parker. She also once said “a silver cord ties me tight to my city.” Her city being New York City. Dorothy Parker lived an extraordinary life in the Big Apple, but what happened after she died is also extraordinary. It’s a story that was li…
 
There’s no denying that the COVID-19 pandemic has placed a dark cloud over New York City, and the rest of the world for that matter. But, bright spots still shine through each and every day. Among them, community gardens that have long been a place of comfort and hope for weary New Yorkers. A new book celebrates New York City’s community gardens, a…
 
A lot of people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have traded their traditional workplace clothes for more comfortable and leisurely apparel -- sweatpants, T-shirts, slippers, etc. But, a new book takes a closer look at how what we choose to wear can affect how we think and work. It's called Dress Your Best Life: How to Use Fashion Psy…
 
Will they come back? Midtown Manhattan, the center of business in New York City, is still looking pretty empty these days. Office workers have yet to come back in large numbers. Is the shift to working from home becoming permanent and what will this mean to corporate efforts to diversify the workplace? For years there’s been talk that automation an…
 
Like many small businesses, Economy Candy, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, has had to pivot to stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic. The iconic New York City candy shop is making the most of online sales, but also going old school. They’ve stationed a pushcart outside of their store dubbed ‘Economy Candy To-Go.” And to make candy shopping su…
 
For the first time in its history, New York City’s Central Park is home to a monument depicting real-life women. This summer, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, a statue of women’s rights pioneers Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Sojourner Truth, made its debut on Central Park’s Literary Walk. The nonprofit organization Monumental Women was …
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has crippled New York City’s street vendors. With foot traffic slowed to a crawl in many neighborhoods, vendors are struggling to make ends meet, and some have decided not to return to the streets because the dollars and cents just don’t add up. On this week's show, we’re talking with Mohamed Attia, Director of the Street Vend…
 
Our guest this week knows a thing or two about second chances. When Coss Marte went to prison in 2009, he was faced with not one, but two big challenges: lose weight and discover a legitimate career upon release. Luckily for him, overcoming the first obstacle helped him find the answer to the other. Coss, a former drug kingpin, is now helping other…
 
Matt Bocchi was nine-years-old when his father perished in the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11th, 2001. What followed for Matt was a life filled with psychological and emotional torment. Matt got involved with alcohol and drugs after an uncle through marriage took advantage of his vulnerability and sexually abused him. Now as we ma…
 
If you’re like the team at Cityscape, you’ve had your fair share of ice cream this summer. It’s the perfect treat on a hot summer day, but then again, if you ask us, it’s the perfect treat anytime. In this edition of Cityscape, we’re checking in with a unique ice cream shop that’s serving both delicious ice cream and the community at large. Sugar H…
 
For emerging artists, securing a residency can be transformational. And now in New York City, a new artist-in-residence opportunity has emerged in perhaps an unlikely place -- Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn. Green-Wood Cemetery recently announced a new nine month long artist-in-residence program. The chosen artist will have the opportunity to use …
 
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