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“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and the Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, former Dean of the School of Biblical & Theological Studies and Professor of New Testament, it features language experts discussing the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and showing how reading the Bible in the original “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a dif ...
 
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Dr. Michael Graves, Armerding Professor of Biblical Studies at Wheaton College, thinks about how a variety of biblical texts help us understand what it means for God to punish the children of those who sin “to the third and fourth generations,” and to show love “to a thousand generations” of those who love him.…
 
Dr. Gene Green is Professor Emeritus of New Testament at Wheaton College and Graduate School, and Dean of Trinity International University – Florida. In this episode, Dr. Green explains what “Relevance Theory” is, how he became interested in its contribution to biblical interpretation, and how it helps us “mind the gap” between “what is said and wh…
 
Travis Wright, a PhD student from Cambridge University, shares his passion for reading Greek and Hebrew. He and another Cambridge colleague have started online classes in both languages at https://biblingo.org/live/. If your Greek and Hebrew are rusty and need a polish, then their classes, tutorials, and workshops may be just for you.…
 
Dr. Aubrey Buster, Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, explains a “denominative verb” of Exodus 34:29, which could be interpreted as either “rays of light” or “horns.” Translating it as “horns,” as did Jerome’s Vulgate, led to artistic portrayals of Moses with horns and fed into later anti-Semitic ideologies.…
 
Dr. Andrew Abernethy, Associate Professor of Old Testament and Degree Coordinator for the Master of Arts in Biblical Exegesis Program at Wheaton Graduate School, walks us through a passage from a not-so-minor prophet, Haggai 2:4, to investigate the meaning of that wonderful promise, “My Spirit stands among you.”…
 
Dr. Amy Peeler, Associate Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, directs our attention to Hebrew 12:23 to a phrase often misunderstood and mistranslated. The redeemed make up an assembly of people who have a standing and status of firstborn in the family with all the rights and privileges appertaining thereunto.…
 
Dr. Phillip Marshall is Assistant Professor of Biblical Languages in the School of Christian Thought, Houston Baptist University. He completed his doctoral work in the ancient Greek versions of the Hebrew OT, that is, in Septuagint studies, which helped engender his love for both Greek and Hebrew. In this episode, he joins Dr. David Capes to explor…
 
Dr. Karen Jobes is Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis, Emerita, at Wheaton College. She has authored many books and articles, including Invitation to the Septuagint and commentaries on Esther, 1 Peter, and 1, 2, 3 John. She served for years on the Committee for Bible Translation (responsible for the NIV translation of…
 
Dr. Madison Pierce is Assistant Professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and has written Divine Discourse in the Epistle to the Hebrews (Cambridge University Press, 2020), among other works. She talks about her journey with the biblical languages, and then helps us appreciate the meaning and eloquence of Hebrews’ opening se…
 
Dr. Doug Penney, Associate Professor of Classical Languages at Wheaton College, discusses how he encourages students to read outside the canon of Scripture in order to sharpen their translation skills. Often, when students read a New Testament book in Greek, they rely on their memory to produce a translation. Reading Tobit, a book of the Apocrypha,…
 
Dr. Bill Mounce is the the founder and President of BiblicalTraining.org, and the author of a major commentary on Paul’s letters to Timothy and Titus. In a separate podcast titled “BiblicalTraining.org” we heard more of his life and work. In this episode he joins Dr. Capes to talk about the interpretation, translation, implications, and preaching o…
 
Dr. Michael Graves is the Armerding Professor of Biblical Studies at Wheaton College. He has produced several books and articles, including a modern translation of Jerome’s Commentary on Jeremiah (IVP Academic, 2012). He is currently working on his own commentary on the same prophet. In this episode, Dr. Graves discusses the “tin woodman theology” …
 
Dr. Philip Ryken, president of Wheaton College and Professor of Theology, joins David Capes to discuss both the context and meaning of a popular verse these days, Jeremiah 29:7. What is the semantic range of the word often translated “welfare” or “peace”? How could that have meaning for people not living in exile? Or are we?…
 
Dr. Aubrey Buster, Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, contemplates how a translation of an ambiguous word can reflect and/or lead to serious errors of perception, including perceptions of race and social class. A common Hebrew conjunction used in Song of Songs 1:5 could be read as “black but beautiful” or “black and beautiful.…
 
Dr. Julie Newberry, Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, joins Dr. Capes to consider the ramifications of the kind of “dark joy” found among the Jerusalem leaders who conspired with Judas to betray Jesus (Luke 22:5). Sometimes, “joy” in Luke is morally ambivalent.Door Wheaton College
 
Dr. Daniel J. Treier is the Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Theology at Wheaton Graduate School, and Ph.D. program director. He has authored numerous books and articles, including the award-winning Introducing Evangelical Theology. He has written a commentary on Proverbs & Ecclesiastes, and is starting another on Philippians. He reflects on the qu…
 
Dr. Scott Callaham is Lecturer of Hebrew and Old Testament at Baptist Theological Seminary, Singapore. He has authored and edited a number of books and articles and is currently completing a new teaching grammar of Biblical Aramaic. Dr. Callaham discusses the form, meaning, and theological significance of the Aramaic term Abba, which Jesus uses in …
 
Andrew Burlingame is Assistant Professor of Hebrew at Wheaton College within the Department of Modern and Classical Languages. He has authored several articles, one of which received the 2018 Sean W. Dever Memorial Prize of the W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem. He observes that until now we have had to guess at the mea…
 
Dr. Richard Schultz, the Blanchard Professor of Old Testament in Wheaton College Graduate School, has co-edited with Daniel Block, Isaianic Intertextuality and Intratextuality as Composition-Historical Indicators: Methodological Challenges in Determining Literary Influence, along with other books and articles. In this episode he discusses the conte…
 
Dr. Julie Newberry, Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, investigates the language of Joy and rejoicing in the Gospel of Luke. The angel’s greeting (Luke 1:28) to Mary might not be just a greeting after all. She considers the contrast between Zechariah’s encounter and Mary’s.Door Wheaton
 
Dr. Alexander Loney, Associate Professor of Classical Languages at Wheaton College, stops by to talk with Dr. Capes about how the Greeks understood the gods, where they came from, how they functioned. Homer and Hesiod composed “the Bible” of the Greeks, and they provide a very different worldview than the biblical writers.…
 
Dr. Peter Williams is Principal, Tyndale House in Cambridge, England. He is also chair of the International Greek New Testament Project, a member of the translation committee of the English Standard Version of the Bible, associate editor of The Greek New Testament produced at Tyndale House, and has authored other books and studies. In this episode …
 
Dr. Robert Plummer, the Collin and Eveyln Aikman Professor of Biblical Studies at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, started a free daily 2-minute screencast about five years ago designed to help pastors, seminary students, and others keep reading their Greek New Testaments. He describes how it has grown into thousands of archived episodes …
 
Dr. Lynn Cohick, provost/dean and Professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary, has authored several books, including commentaries on Philippians and Ephesians as well as Christian Women in the Patristic World, with Amy Brown Hughes (Wheaton PhD ’13; MA ‘08). In this podcast she talks about how studying a text in its original language goes beyond …
 
Dr. Adam E. Miglio, Associate Professor of Archaeology at Wheaton College, demonstrates that exegesis involves knowing more than grammar and vocabulary. Often biblical authors employ strategic ambiguity to cause us to slow down and ask what a word or phrase means. He treats Genesis 4.7 and the phrase “you must/will rule over it,” which characterize…
 
Dr. Nijay Gupta, Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary, has authored several books and articles, including his recent, Paul and the Language of Faith (Eerdmans, 2020). In this conversation with Dr. Capes, he discusses the poetic language of one of the New Testament’s most important passages about Christ and his work. What in the Greek wor…
 
Dr. Aubrey Buster, Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, discusses with David Capes the meaning of the Hebrew Name that God takes for himself during his first appearance to Moses. What its meaning was, why it was given, how it has been spelled and pronounced in the Hebrew and English traditions, and why these later forms were ado…
 
Dr. Bill Mounce (https://www.billmounce.com/about), is the the founder and President of BiblicalTraining.org. He also serves on the Committee for Bible Translation (responsible for the NIV translation of the Bible), is author of Basics of Biblical Greek and other works, and was formerly a professor at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and Azusa P…
 
Dr. John Walton, Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School, lays out the importance of knowing the context of a passage to understand it. After discussing four kinds of context for exegesis, he focuses on the historical context. As a test case, he takes us to Daniel 7:1 to understand what is happening historically at the time of…
 
Dr. John Walton, Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School, lays out the importance of knowing the context of a passage to understand it. After discussing four kinds of context for exegesis, he focuses on the linguistic context. As a test case, he takes us to 1 Samuel 13:14: “the LORD sought out a man after his own heart [David]…
 
Dr. Robert Plummer, the Collin and Eveyln Aikman Professor of Biblical Studies at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the host of the Daily Dose of Greek screencast (dailydoseofgreek.com), considers whether the Lord teaches us to pray for deliverance from evil in general, as many translations have it, or from "the evil one," the devil. Gr…
 
Dr. Jon Laansma, Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis at Wheaton College, uses Titus 2:13 to illustrate how the knowledge of Greek grammar doesn’t usually lead to one “correct” interpretive conclusion, but to a range of viable interpretations. The gains are knowing the boundaries of what is viable and the ability to con…
 
Dr. Andrew Abernethy, Associate Professor of Old Testament and Degree Coordinator for the Master of Arts in Biblical Exegesis Program, shows us how Isaiah 53:4 was interpreted and translated in the Latin Vulgate by Jerome. He translated it that Jesus was “like a leper” stricken by God and rejected for the diseases he bore. As a result artists and p…
 
Dr. Doug Penney, Associate Professor of Classical Languages, discusses how he encourages students to read outside the canon of Scripture in order to sharpen their translation skills. Often, when students read a New Testament book in Greek, they rely on their memory to produce a translation. Reading Aesop’s Fables takes them to a text they do not kn…
 
Dr. Amy Peeler, Associate Professor of New Testament, joins Dr. Capes to talk about an important Christological statement in Hebrews 12:1-2. What does it mean that Jesus is “the author and perfector of the faith”? How does that statement pull together a variety of motifs earlier in the letter?Door Wheaton College
 
Dr. David Capes introduces season 2 of the popular podcast, Exegetically Speaking, featuring faculty and friends of Wheaton College (IL) discussing the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.”Door Wheaton College
 
Picking up with Martin Van Buren in Jackson’s cabinet, Jay and Luke trace the Little Magicians rise to the vice presidency, his political knife fighting with John C. Calhoun, and his successful introduction of the party convention system. His presidency, bedeviled by the Panic of 1837 at home and trouble abroad with Britain and Mexico, gave rise to…
 
Martin Van Buren, nicknamed the Red Fox of Kinderhook and the Little Magician, was the first American president born after American independence, the first raised in a home where English was not the primary language, and the first true political organizer. A political genius, who created the model of the nineteenth-century political machine, Van Bu…
 
Like his father in so many ways, JQA was a man of immense talents, a statesman of vast achievements, a brilliant political mind, and — like his father — a one-term president. JQA may, still, be the most qualified person ever to reach the presidency. And yet from the outset, his presidency was a failure. His political angling to get the presidency, …
 
The Adams administration saw the rapid, shocking collapse of Federalism as an organized force in American political life. The regnant faction that had forced through ratification, secured America’s diplomatic position, and stabilized the public credit, disappeared utterly from the national stage. How did this happen? And if Federalist policies were…
 
Foreign policy became a key divide between Federalists and the emerging Jeffersonian Republicans, all the more so as Britain and France escalated a rolling series of continental wars. At the same time, domestic polarization around Hamilton’s plan of public finance and its successor policies, contributed to a roiling base of political support for Je…
 
Welcome to our three-episode miniseries on Federalism. We’re taking a deep dive into America’s first political party, which governed for the first twelve years under the Constitution, then collapsed entirely. Who were the Federalists? What did they believe? Why were they so dominant and then so completely destroyed? Our first episode takes a big pi…
 
No Founding Father thought more deeply about the presidency than Alexander Hamilton. He was an enthusiastic supporter of a strong chief executive and believed the president had a central and vital role to play in American government, both at home and abroad. Hamilton was also a realist when it came to the nature of politics and, unlike some of his …
 
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